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News stories tagged with "crows"

Cody Baciuska, of Loomacres Wildlife Management, fires pyrotechnics into the sky to scare away Watertown's winter crow flock. Photo: Joanna Richards
Cody Baciuska, of Loomacres Wildlife Management, fires pyrotechnics into the sky to scare away Watertown's winter crow flock. Photo: Joanna Richards

Watertown scares away thousands of crows with pyrotechnics, noise

It's an eerie sight: Every winter, around dusk each night, a flock of between 20,000 and 30,000 crows gathers in the trees around the Black River in Watertown.

They can be a neat sight against the white winter landscape, but the city wants them gone. That's because they squawk and poop and generally annoy a lot of city residents. The city has hired a wildlife management company to disperse the birds.  Go to full article
We go into their area and harass them with tools like pyrotechnics, high powered lights, distress calls, remote-controlled aircraft.

Crow "hazing" continues Tuesday, Wednesday nights in Watertown

In Watertown, wildlife biologists will be out "crow hazing" tonight. They're trying to scare away the city's huge winter population of the birds. It's estimated there are as many as 30,000 crows roosting in Watertown right now.  Go to full article
There are very particular areas they like to go. Maybe on top of the state office building. I see them there at night.

Watertown plans winter "crow hazing"

It's not winter quite yet...but Watertown is already thinking about one recurring winter problem. Every year, the city's population increases dramatically--by the seasonal arrival of 15,000-20,000 crows.

The city considers the crows to be a nuisance and employs a tactic called "crow hazing"--it's generally, although not always, a non-lethal method to convince the crows to go elsewhere.

The city council's in the process of deciding which of several crow hazing services to use for this task.

Nora Flaherty spoke with Elliott Nelson at the city manager's office about Watertown's crow problem, and what "crow hazing" entails.  Go to full article
Crows are roosting in huge groups in cities all over the country. The USDA is trying to find ways to get them to go back to their natural habitat. (Photo by Paige Foster)
Crows are roosting in huge groups in cities all over the country. The USDA is trying to find ways to get them to go back to their natural habitat. (Photo by Paige Foster)

Cities Take Aim at Roosting Crows

Flocks of crows are nothing new in most cities. In the fall and winter months, crows forage for food during the day and roost in city trees at night. The birds like cities because they're safe and comfortable. The residents generally don't like the crows, though. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Skye Rohde reports.  Go to full article

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