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News stories tagged with "csea"

Former state Department of Transportation engineer Mike Fayette holds a copy of the Aug. 30, 2012 issue of the <em>Enterprise</em>, which contained a story about DOT's response to Tropical Storm Irene that he was quoted in. The story prompted DOT to threaten to fire him for talking to the press without getting the necessary approval. Photo: Chris Knight, courtesy of <a href="http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com"><em>Adirondack Daily Enterprise</em></a>
Former state Department of Transportation engineer Mike Fayette holds a copy of the Aug. 30, 2012 issue of the Enterprise, which contained a story about DOT's response to Tropical Storm Irene that he was quoted in. The story prompted DOT to threaten to fire him for talking to the press without getting the necessary approval. Photo: Chris Knight, courtesy of Adirondack Daily Enterprise

DOT worker: punished for praise?

A 30-year state Department of Transportation employee said he was forced to retire for speaking to a newspaper reporter without approval from his agency's communications office.

Mike Fayette, DOT's top official in Essex County, said he was threatened with termination for talking to The Adirondack Daily Enterprise for a story in which he praised the DOT's response to Tropical Storm Irene. A version of the same story, also from reporter Chris Knight, ran on NCPR.

DOT officials are refusing to comment on Fayette's case. Some observers say it's just another sign of how Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration has worked to limit and control public information. Chris Knight is still following the story.  Go to full article
Governor Cuomo delivering his budget address, January 2012
Governor Cuomo delivering his budget address, January 2012

Cuomo, unions go head to head on Tier VI pensions

Public worker unions have gone on the offensive against Governor Andrew Cuomo's proposed new pension tier, invoking class warfare. Meanwhile the governor is warning that if there's no resolution, thousands of local government employees will be laid off.  Go to full article
If they have tweaks that would come to a different outcome, great, letís talk about them (but they have to be) revenue neutral.

Union leadership hopes for second chance

In Albany, it's the Cuomo Administration vs. the rank and file of the Public Employees Federation. Union leaders hope for another chance on the contract members rejected last week.
Pink slips were sent out to almost 3,500 PEF members last week -- including about 175 here in the North Country. The layoffs begin to take effect in the next three weeks, unless the union and the governor come to a new contract deal soon.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo had been hoping for concessions from PEF's membership as the state continues to deal with a $10 billion budget deficit. But the membership rejected a deal similar to one ratified earlier this year by the Civil Service Employees Association.

Friday, Cuomo opened the door to "tweaks" that could avert the layoffs, but as Karen DeWitt reports, he says it's entirely up to the union leadership whether the job cut backs occur or not.  Go to full article
He came in with a carrot and stick approach, but not an attack approach.

Cuomo gets major concessions in CSEA contract

Governor Andrew Cuomo scored another win when he convinced the largest state worker union, the Civil Service Employees Association, to make concessions in its new contract. In Albany, Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article
If the public employees think they can get a big raise from the state they can't...We don't have the money.

Cuomo, unions still talking

Governor Cuomo may have achieved an on time budget for only the third time in 25 years, but there is one April 1 deadline he missed. State worker contracts expired March 31st, and a new deal with public employees has not been reached. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

County nursing homes including E'town's Horace Nye could be privatized

This week, county leaders from across New York state met to discuss the future of nursing homes run by local governments. In many counties, the homes provide crucial care to elderly and sick residents. But the facilities are costing taxpayers millions of dollars to operate.

The Horace Nye home in Elizabethtown is expected to lose close to $2 million this year. As Brian Mann reports, a growing number of local leaders say those costs are too high at a time when property taxes are soaring.  Go to full article

Clarkson?s CSEA approves contract

Members of the Civil Service Employees Union at Clarkson University approved a new contract yesterday. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Clarkson workers hold second protest

Dozens of Clarkson University workers marched through downtown Potsdam on Thursday afternoon. They're protesting a contract offer from the school. Gregory Warner reports.  Go to full article

Pataki vetoes early retirement bill

Governor Pataki has vetoed an early retirement plan for state workers passed by the legislature. Budget watchdog groups are urging Governor Pataki to veto a number of other public pension sweetener bills as well. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

CSEA Backs Spitzer For Governor

State Attorney General and leading gubernatorial candidate Eliot Spitzer received the endorsement of the state's largest public employee union. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

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