Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "cuomo"

Maybe Shelly Silver, the speaker, is raising taxes, but were cutting taxes.

Republicans and Dems spin the new tax bill

New York lawmakers piled on last night to approve an overhaul of the state's income tax rates. First, the Republican led Senate voted 55-0 for the measure. The Assembly followed with a 130-8 vote.

The measure was backed by Governor Andrew Cuomo. It will increases taxes on millionaires, but give 4.4 million middle-class residents a rare break worth $200 to $400 a year.

State Senate Republican Leader Dean Skelos says it's the first rate reduction for middle class earners in 50 years. But conservative critics say New York will continue to have one of the nation's highest tax rates, and New York City residents will pay the highest rate in the nation.

The deal required a change of mind for most of the lawmakers who passed it last night, and for Gov. Cuomo, who had promised to "freeze" taxes during his campaign last year. As they gathered for the vote yesterday, lawmakers were busy portraying the deal in the best possible light. Critics complained about the hasty, behind-closed-doors process. In Albany, Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article
Now we need to go a step further, and make a serious effort to reform and reduce spending

NC lawmakers praise tax deal, with reservations

North Country lawmakers are praising the outcome of the special session held yesterday in Albany.

Republican state Senator Betty Little from Queensbury said the income tax deal negotiated by Governor Cuomo would cut income taxes for the "vast majority of New Yorkers." Little predicted the tax plan would "encourage economic activity and job growth."

Eight Assembly Republicans voted against the tax overhaul. North Country Republicans in the Assembly approved it, with reservations.  Go to full article
There is not an intelligent or productive way to close the current gap without generating revenue.

Cuomo and legislative leaders announce more progressive tax plan

Governor Cuomo and legislative leaders have announced a deal they say will raise taxes on the rich, and slightly lower taxes for the middle class. In Albany, Karen DeWitt has this report.  Go to full article

New tax code lowers middle class taxes, raises taxes on richest--slightly

Governor Cuomo and legislative leaders have reached an agreement on tax code changes that includes a slightly lowered rate for the middle class, and higher taxes on millionaires. In Albany, Karen DeWitt has the details:  Go to full article

Cuomo calls for fairness in tax code changes

Behind the scenes talks in Albany could result in a revamped state tax code, apparently increasing taxes on the wealthy next year. Governor Cuomo, who is asking for the changes, is also proposing a gambling expansion and other initiatives.

Cuomo promised to "freeze taxes" since his campaign a year ago, is now pushing the changes. The plan would also cut taxes for the middle class.

Cuomo continues to avoid saying he supports a tax hike for the rich. But after a year of strongly opposing a "millionaire tax," Cuomo has said he's open to the idea. As Karen DeWitt reports, the governor hopes the legislature will consider his proposals later this week.  Go to full article

Counties want state takeover of Medicaid costs

Counties across New York state are supporting legislation that would phase out the local share of Medicaid payments, but officials doubt the bills will ever become law.

Medicaid, a state program for New Yorkers who can't afford medical care, is among the biggest strains on county budgets, especially as lawmakers struggle to present budgets that meet the state's new 2 percent cap on property tax growth.

The Senate and Assembly introduced bills earlier this fall that would shift Medicaid costs from the county level to the state. Chris Morris reports.  Go to full article
The banks of the Grand River, downstream from the planned Lower Churchill Project. Some local residents think the project could produce lower water levels, endangering fishing and other traditional pastimes.  Emma Jacobs / WRVO
The banks of the Grand River, downstream from the planned Lower Churchill Project. Some local residents think the project could produce lower water levels, endangering fishing and other traditional pastimes. Emma Jacobs / WRVO

Canadian hydro would come at a price

Yesterday, we brought you our first story on the pros and cons of increasing new York's imports of hydro power generated on Canada's northern rivers.

Today we go to the source: the Churchill River. Innovation Trail reporter Emma Jacobs visited the site of a proposed plan that might send more power our way from the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland & Labrador. As Jacobs reports, the dam could create jobs there, and send more renewable here, but at a price.  Go to full article

Cuomo eyes special session

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a new jobs plan over the weekend. It centers on expanding gaming, and could mean a casino in the catskills, tax credits, and other initiatives.

The plan could be the centerpiece of Gov. Cuomo's second year in office, or it could be presented at a special session of the legislature to be held as early as this week.

The Assembly is coming back to Albany tomorrow for an afternoon conference, and possibly a special session.

In Albany, Karen DeWitt has the details.  Go to full article

State Assembly will be back in Albany--maybe for a special session

The New York State Assembly is coming back to Albany Tuesday for an afternoon conference, and possibly a special session. Governor Andrew Cuomo has been seeking help from the legislature to close the growing budget deficit. In Albany, Karen DeWitt has the details:  Go to full article
Jumping to the tax card right away without seeing what the spending needs are, is premature.

State budget gaps widen; lawmakers look for revenue

The gaps in the New York State budget are widening for the current year and the new fiscal year. Governor Andrew Cuomo and state lawmakers are considering a number of options, including a special session, and revamping of the state's tax code to bring more money into the state coffers. Karen DeWitt has more.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  727-1462 of 1053  next -409 »  last »