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News stories tagged with "dairy"

Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/50546088@N00/7212923168/">Chris Barker</a>, Creative Commons, Some rights reserved.
Photo: Chris Barker, Creative Commons, Some rights reserved.

Schumer: School yogurt program expanding

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer says the federal program adding Greek yogurt to school lunches is expanding from New York, Tennessee, Idaho and Arizona to eight more states.

The Department of Agriculture, which has operated the pilot program, is expected in the next school year to add school cafeterias in California, Iowa, Connecticut, Illinois, North Carolina, Vermont, Washington and Mississippi.  Go to full article
Raw milk. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanishungry/3722209894/sizes/o/in/photolist-6EVijE-757kdN-78d5rf-7b9yeu-7b9yvq-7g1aYW-7hGmXY-7kkHrQ-7tCymc-7tCyxH-7tCy">RyanisHungrye</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Raw milk. Photo: RyanisHungrye, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Raw milk advocate will appeal Ontario ruling to highest court

ONTARIO A farmer who has spent two decades fighting for the right to sell unpasteurized milk is pledging to take his case to the country's highest court.

The Ontario Court of Appeal ruled against Michael Schmidt yesterday in his appeal of his conviction for breaking public health laws.  Go to full article
Photo: David Sommerstein
Photo: David Sommerstein

Vt. dairy farmers create management program

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) Vermont has a new program, created by farmers, to help dairy farmers better manage their operations. Officials say it was developed by individual farmers who wanted access to the best technical assistance they could find.

DairyVision VT offers dairy farmers management teams to help make the operations more profitable. The idea behind it was to grow the production of commercial milk in Vermont by educating farmers in better, more efficient ways to farm.  Go to full article
Photo: Julie Grant
Photo: Julie Grant

Farm Bill helps dairy farmers go organic

Going organic offers a higher milk price for dairy farmers. But it's expensive to earn organic certification and learn a whole new mind set for producing milk without chemicals or antibiotics. The new Farm Bill increases funding to help conventional farmers make the transition.

Ellen Abbott reports on one central New York farmer who's happy he made made the switch.  Go to full article
Congressman Bill Owens and farmer Richard Eakins talk about corn storage. Owens voted in favor of the Farm Bill. Photo: Sarah Harris.
Congressman Bill Owens and farmer Richard Eakins talk about corn storage. Owens voted in favor of the Farm Bill. Photo: Sarah Harris.

Farm Bill moves on to Senate

The bipartisan compromise version of the Farm Bill sailed through the House of Representatives yesterday, with 60% of lawmakers voting yes. David Sommerstein reports on the 5 year, $500 billion package.  Go to full article
Photo: USDA, Some rights reserved.
Photo: USDA, Some rights reserved.

What's in the Farm Bill for the North Country?

A revamped Farm Bill could reach the House floor for a vote as early as today. The massive legislation which sets agricultural and nutrition policy for the country has already been scuttled two years in a row. But bipartisan negotiators say they have a $500 billion five-year package that will pass.

David Sommerstein joins Martha Foley to talk about what the Farm Bill would mean for the North Country.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/50546088@N00/7212923168/">Chris Barker</a>, Creative Commons, Some rights reserved.
Photo: Chris Barker, Creative Commons, Some rights reserved.

NY school lunch yogurt pilot program expanded

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) Based on the success of a three-month pilot program in New York and three other states, officials say the U.S. Department of Agriculture has decided to expand a program adding Greek yogurt to school lunches.

Sen. Charles Schumer on Thursday said participating schools in New York, Tennessee, Idaho and Arizona consumed 200,000 pounds of Chobani Greek yogurt during the three-month pilot program last fall. Chobani is made in New York, which leads the U.S. in Greek yogurt production.  Go to full article
Photo: David Sommerstein
Photo: David Sommerstein

2014 could be a good year for dairy farms

2013 was another comeback year for the dairy industry, after near-record low milk prices forced thousands of dairy farmers out of business during the recession. But the high cost of energy and feed still made it hard for farms to make money.

Two of the top industry forecasters say that could change for the better in 2014. David Sommerstein spoke with Mark Stephenson, who directs the Center for Dairy Profitability at the University of Wisconsin, and Andy Novacovic, a professor of agricultural economics at Cornell University, about what the new year might hold for dairy farmers and how the Farm Bill debate in Congress could affect life on the farm.

Stephenson says soaring corn prices are finally coming down, with a record harvest last summer and declining use of corn in producing ethanol. That means dairy farmers will pay less for feed, so they'll end up with better profit margins this year.  Go to full article
An Amish farm in St. Lawrence county. Photo: Sarah Harris
An Amish farm in St. Lawrence county. Photo: Sarah Harris

Amish farmers partner with Agri-Mark

Most of the North Country is losing population, and losing farms. But there's one group that keeps growing: Old Order Amish. They're drawn to the St. Lawrence Valley by the area's cheap, available farmland.

The Amish live an agrarian lifestyle that's more 19th century than 21st century. But in order to support their communities and their culture, the Amish have had to find a place in the local economy, including the dairy industry and an unlikely partnership with Agri-Mark.

Agri-Mark provides electrified milk houses where the Amish can deposit their milk. The partnership is expanding: Agri-Mark has built 4 new milk houses since June of 2013.  Go to full article
Lenny Merculdi and Blake Putnam fill the "Bigfoot" with used plastics. Photo: David Sommerstein
Lenny Merculdi and Blake Putnam fill the "Bigfoot" with used plastics. Photo: David Sommerstein

Story 2.0: More farmers recycle ag plastics

Four years ago, state environmental officials made it illegal to burn trash and other waste anywhere in New York. That meant the end of the burn barrel, then a common sight across the countryside. Burn barrels were a major source of cancer-causing dioxin and other toxic chemicals in the air.

The burn ban also meant farmers could no longer burn the agricultural plastics that have become ubiquitous in farming. Trucking them to a landfill is the most common, but expensive, alternative. But more and more farmers are recycling them.

Our ongoing series, Story 2.0, checks back in on stories from the past.  Go to full article

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