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News stories tagged with "dairy"

Kraft Canton in Jeopardy


The future of the St. Lawrence County factory that makes award-winning Kraft cheddar cheese is uncertain. Kraft says it's evaluating the efficiency of its Canton plant along with others around the country. David Sommerstein has more.
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Dairy Farmers Revive Old Customs

If you drive out into the countryside these days, expecting pastoral scenes of placid cows grazing leisurely on grassy hillsides, you'll be at least 50 years too late. Traditional pastoral herding practices, based on the summertime abundance of self-renewing grasses, has mostly disappeared. It's been replaced by year-round production based on dried feeds grown from intensively worked soils. But some farms are resisting the trend. The Pleasant Ridge Farm in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, like a number of other farms around the Great Lakes region, is an example of a successful and quite modern, revival of pasture-based agriculture. You would also find an incredibly tasty cheese. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Ed Janus reports.  Go to full article

Benefits and Risks of Cloned Cows

Milk production is big business in New York and the upper Midwest. Now the president of a biotech company in Wisconsin is milking a herd of cloned cows that he says could give the Great Lakes dairy industry a boost. But there are still questions about the health of cloned cows and whether the milk they produce is safe for human consumption. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Gil Halsted has the story.  Go to full article

North Country Dairy Industry Considers Its Future

Stakeholders in the North Country dairy industry are hoping a series of meeting will help them develop a strategy for keeping area agricultural businesses successful. More than 100 people representing many sides of the dairy industry have been meeting since last November and have compiled dozens of ideas, including how to improve education, marketing and milk-pricing. As Jodi Tosti reports, one plan to come out of the meeting would provide job training for farm workers.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Milk

What is milk and why do we like it? According to Dr. Curt Stager it's a suspension of lipid globules in water, and is really kind of yucky when you think about it.  Go to full article

New Farm Bill Replaces Northeast Dairy Compact Benefits

The US Senate has passed a farm bill that boosts subsidies for dairy, grain and cotton farmers and doubled the support for conservation programs. New York Senator Charles Schumer says most importantly for New York is that the National Dairy Program will give dairy farmers the same benefits as the now defunct Northeast Dairy Compact would have given.  Go to full article

People: Judy Aldrich, St. Lawrence County Dairy Farmer

Martha Foley talks with St. Lawrence county farmer Judy Aldrich about old and new challenges facing dairy farmers and the dairy industry. Aldrich serves on a national advisory committee at the USDA.  Go to full article

Northeast Dairy Compact Nearer to Restoration

Milk price protections for dairy farmers inched closer to reality this week. The Senate voted in favor of keeping a $2 billion dairy plan in the government's five-year farm bill. The program would pay Northeast farmers when the price of milk drops below set levels. Senator Hillary Clinton says there are three objectives of the bill--the first is a strong safety net for dairy farmers until a compact is put back in place.  Go to full article

Ending the Summer With Ice Cream

Brian Mann drops by Donnelly's ice cream stand between Saranac Lake and Paul Smith's to gather some thoughts on the end of summer.  Go to full article

Farmers Take Foot-and-Mouth Threat Seriously

The foot-and-mouth outbreak afflicting overseas livestock has left New York farmers and agriculture observers waiting nervously to see what the impact will be on the state's farm scene. Since the foot-and-mouth cases were identified in England, food inspectors and customs officials have tightened controls at borders to ensure the disease isn't accidentally brought here. If there is an outbreak in the US, officials say there would have to be widespread slaughter of livestock much as has been seen in Britain in recent weeks. As Todd Moe found out, North Country farmers are taking the risk of foot-and-mouth disease seriously.  Go to full article

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