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News stories tagged with "demographics"

There doesn't seem to be as many babies. Our baby is pretty much standing alone right now. When I grew up...there was a ton of kids...

As Hamilton County ages, will communities hang on?

Last week, the US Census found that the New York population is aging much faster than the rest of New York state. The average resident in St. Lawrence County is forty years old. The number of young children in the county, below age five, dropped ten percent over the last decade.

In Hamilton County, the median age is even higher - more than 51 years old. That's thirteen years older, on average, than New York state as a whole. Brian Mann was in Hamilton County last week talking to people about the Census findings and what these numbers mean for their communities. He talks with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

Debate parses the good and bad of Adirondack Census numbers

The latest U.S. Census delivered good and bad news about population shifts across the rural North Country.

Inside the Adirondack Park Blue Line, the numbers showed an overall gain in population. But the details sparked a debate about how to interpret the data, about what it really means for communities that struggle with the dynamics of decline in rural America overlaid with the Park's additional rules and regulations.

Brian Mann joined Martha Foley this morning to sort through the Census and how it's being parsed.  Go to full article
Map courtesy Prison Policy Initiative
Map courtesy Prison Policy Initiative

Where should prisoners be counted? The Downstate view.

Where should prisoners be counted? Right now, inmates in New York prisons are counted IN prison - rather than in their hometowns. Critics call the practice "prison-based gerrymandering," and New York lawmakers are considering whether to end it this year. At an event in New York City Hall last month, Reverend Al Sharpton helped launch a campaign to change the inmate count. "I think that this is the voters rights and civil rights issue of this year in the state of New York," said Sharpton. But others think the mostly Upstate communities that host prisons deserve the boost in political power that comes with the count of inmates. Lawmakers need to settle the issue before political redistricting efforts get underway next year. In a collaboration between WNYC in New York City and North Country Public Radio, we bring you both sides of the issue. Here's the view from Downstate, from reporter Beth Fertig from WNYC.  Go to full article
Ogdensburg Correctional Facility sits on prime St. Lawrence riverfront.  It's slated for closure, but the community's fighting to save its nearly 300 jobs.
Ogdensburg Correctional Facility sits on prime St. Lawrence riverfront. It's slated for closure, but the community's fighting to save its nearly 300 jobs.

Where should prisoners be counted in New York? The Upstate view.

This March, the 2010 Census count begins, a process required by the Constitution every 10 years, which helps, primarily, in determining the number of seats each state gets in Congress. But what happens if someone is in a prison far from home? How should he be counted by the state? The controversial prisoner census issue splits largely along an urban and rural divide. New York City politicians are pushing to end the practice of counting prisoners where they're jailed. But upstate, where the majority of prisons are located, politicians think they deserve the boost in political power that comes with counting prisoners. Lawmakers need to settle the issue before political redistricting efforts get underway next year. In a collaboration between North Country Public Radio and WNYC, David Sommerstein reports on the view from the North Country.  Go to full article

Ag census deadline next Friday

The deadline for the North Country's 4,500 farmers to be counted in the census of agriculture is next Friday. The census will help shape farm policy for the next five years. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Redistricting Procrastination

The New York State Assembly and Senate have decided to put off the start of campaign petitioning for another two weeks, until June 18th, while they continue to squabble over how to draw new congressional district lines. The latest redistricting plan sacrifices Republican Ben Gilman of the lower Hudson Valley and Democrat Louise Slaughter of Rochester. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

What's a Jefferson County Resident?

Jefferson County residents like where they live, would like it better if there were more jobs, volunteer 10 hours a week, and go to Canada less than they used to. That's part of the profile painted by an attitudinal study released yesterday. David Sommerstein has more.  Go to full article

Commentary: Demographics

Ad agency executives are always talking about demographics. But commentator Elle Garrell Berger suspects that many of them may be too young to notice who is really out there buying all those things they want to sell.  Go to full article

Census Shows Increase in Rural Same-sex Couple Households

The 2000 census shows that there are more gay and lesbian couples than ever before living in rural areas. In New York, the number of same-sex couples living in small towns has jumped nearly five-fold. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

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