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News stories tagged with "denmark"

Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael, love spending the winter months in their rustic home, filled with looms, near Harrisville.  Originally from Denmark, Lis uses bright colors to help offset overcast skies and the snowy landscape. Photo: Todd Moe
Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael, love spending the winter months in their rustic home, filled with looms, near Harrisville. Originally from Denmark, Lis uses bright colors to help offset overcast skies and the snowy landscape. Photo: Todd Moe

Living with looms and working with wool

March is the start of another busy season of exhibits, fairs and road trips for artisans across the region. Over the next few months, we'll bring you some of the voices of the many folks in the North Country who make a living in their own workshops, basements and spare rooms. It might sound charming - setting your own work hours - but the artisans we've talked to say full-time art is not an easy decision and a lot of hard work. Finding space, commissions, marketing, moral support, and reserving uninterrupted creative time are some of the challenges.

Today, a trip to the woods near Harrisville, in the northwestern Adirondacks, to visit a couple who gave up jobs in marketing and at the post office to devote their attention to all things fiber, from woven rugs to knitted sweaters. Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael moved from New Jersey to the North Country twenty years ago. The new environment offered a chance to focus on following a dream -- spending time together as artisans inspired by the mountains, deep woods and solitude.  Go to full article

Nature Conservancy sells 92,000 acres to Dutch firm

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy yesterday unveiled one of the largest timber sales in North Country history. The green group, based in Keene Valley, is selling 92 thousand acres of timber land to ATP, a Danish pension fund. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article

Denmark offers a contrasting bottom line on health care

Jeppe Sorenson is a research associate for the Danish Institute of Health. Sorensen's research includes comparisons of universal health care systems - like Denmark's, with market-based health care - like here in the U.S. In Denmark, there's no exchange of money between patient and provider - people pay for their healthcare through their taxes. Despite fundamental differences, the goal, healthy citizens, is the same. Some of the problems, including cost and distribution of appropriate care and services, sound similar. So do some of the solutions. Denmark is also looking at decentralizing, from regional to community-based care. Sorensen said that's subject of intense debate in Denmark. Danes are used to arguing about their healthcare -- every year at budget time.  Go to full article

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