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News stories tagged with "department-of-labor"

Critics say the Department of Labor "scrubbed" its website of documents about child safety on farms
Critics say the Department of Labor "scrubbed" its website of documents about child safety on farms

Critics say farm safety rules scrapped because of election year politics

The Obama administration has scrapped an effort to introduce new safety regulations designed to protect the tens of thousands of kids who work in agriculture.

Many farmers are applauding the decision to shelve the rules, calling it a victory for their rural way of life.

But safety experts say more teenagers under the age of 16 die each year working on farms than in all other industries combined.

With the presidential election just six months away, supporters and critics alike say the new rules were just too controversial. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
You’re not seeing those people in statistics. They’re not being counted.

North Country job numbers don't tell the whole story

The state department of labor last week released numbers that show unemployment is down in the North Country. Last year at this time, the unemployment rate was 8.8%--now it's 8.4%.

St. Lawrence County had the largest decline, with August unemployment down .8% from July.

Any good economic numbers sound like good news, but unemployment statistics don't necessarily give a complete picture.

For example, they don't count people who've given up looking, or who are working part-time but would like to work more--or people who can't afford to work. Nora Flaherty took a look at what the numbers do--and don't--tell us.  Go to full article

Labor economist: Massena news matches regional, national trend

General Motors' decision follows a trend that has rapidly decimated the high-wage manufacturing jobs that once sustained North Country towns like Newton Falls and Malone. Alan Beideck is an analyst with the New York state Department of Labor, based in Saranac Lake. According to Beideck, manufacturing jobs will be hard to replace. Factory jobs in St. Lawrence County pay an average salary of around $51,000 a year. That compares with just $31,000 for most of the county's workers.  Go to full article

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