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News stories tagged with "development"

Keene supervisor Bill Ferebee next to a boulder that's about to give way (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Keene supervisor Bill Ferebee next to a boulder that's about to give way (Photo: Brian Mann)

Keene Valley landslide now "largest in New York State history"

Scientists say the massive landslide in Keene Valley is now the largest ever seen in New York state.

A half-dozen homes on Little Porter Mountain are still threatened and officials say they're monitoring the mass of earth and rock to determine whether more homes below the slide could be affected. Brian Mann has our update.  Go to full article

Bill curtailing Adirondack Park Agency enforcement power fails in Assembly

An effort by North Country lawmakers to limit the enforcement power of the Adirondack Park Agency failed to pass the state Assembly last week. The bill which passed in the Senate would have placed a ten-year statute of limitations on environmental and zoning violations.

As Brian Mann reports, supporters of the change say they'll bring it back next session.  Go to full article

Nature Conservancy challenges Big Tupper resort developer

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy has filed suit in state Supreme Court against the Adirondack Club and Resort developer, Preserve Associates, over access to a logging road the conservancy owns. There's a hearing in Tupper Lake Wednesday. The road goes to the Follensby Pond tract; it also could provide access to a parcel Preserve Associates wants to subdivide for homes.

ARISE, a Tupper Lake-based group, supports the developer. The Nature Conservancy says Preserve Associates has other options. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Facts don't support claims of APA conspiracy in Black Brook

A report published last weekend in the Glens Falls Post-Star raised allegations that the Adirondack Park Agency had conspired illegally with an environmental group. According to the article's sources, state officials schemed with the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, hoping to force a Clinton County man to sell his property. They say the goal was to add John Maye's land to the state Forest Preserve. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann has been investigating the charges. He found no evidence that any collusion or wrongdoing took place.  Go to full article
Adirondack Council's ties to APA scrutinized
Adirondack Council's ties to APA scrutinized

Critics, lawsuit claim Adirondack Council sways APA decisions unfairly

For years, critics have claimed that a prominent environmental group called the Adirondack Council holds too much sway over decisions made by the Adirondack Park Agency. Nearly half of the public members now sitting on the Park Agency commission are former members of the Council's board of directors. State officials say safeguards are in place, preventing any outside group from influencing the APA's deliberations unfairly. But a lawsuit filed in November claims that Park Agency worked secretly with the Council, targeting a real estate developer in Clinton County. Brian Man has our special report.  Go to full article

APA approves Tupper Lake power corridor, despite NY Constitution questions

The Adirondack Park Agency voted on Friday to approve construction of a new power line corridor for Tupper Lake that will cross state forest preserve land. Critics on the board say the decision violates the "forever wild" provision of New York's constitution. The APA also voted to allow a new hotel on Racquette Lake. And they voted to allow Verizon to build a new cell phone tower along the Northway that will be camouflaged to look like a pine tree. It was busy week for the agency. Brian Mann discussed development with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

APA approves massive resort development for North Creek, Adirondacks

The Adirondack Park Agency on Friday approved a massive new resort development for North Creek. Construction of the first phase could begin as early as this summer. When completed, the Front Street resort will have more than a hundred luxury condos and homes, a golf course, restaurants, and three hotels. The project will be tied closely with the Gore Mountain Ski area.  Go to full article

Amendment allows Raquette Lake well in ADK preserve

Next Tuesday, millions of New Yorkers will vote on a constitutional amendment that will determine the future of one tiny Adirondack village. The proposed change would allow the 160 residents of Raquette Lake to draw drinking water from a well that sits on the Adirondack forest preserve. The constitutional amendment is needed because most human structures are banned on state land in the six-million acre park. As Brian Mann reports, the ballot initiative represents a partnership between local government leaders and pro-environment groups.  Go to full article
John Collins (Source: RCPA)
John Collins (Source: RCPA)

Collins: Residents Committee faces challenges, change

The Residents Committee to Protect the Adirondacks has emerged as one of the most influential (and often one of the most controversial) pro-environment groups in the North Country. The RCPA has taken a lead role opposing the proposed resort development in Tupper Lake and also raised early alarms about the spread of second homes in the Adirondacks. But the Residents Committee is going through a period of upheaval. Long-time executive director Peter Bauer resigned this month to take a new job in Lake George. John Collins is the former head of the Adirondack Museum and a former chairman of the Adirondack Park Agency. He was chosen last week to take over as the RCPA's chairman. Collins told Brian Mann that his group hopes to maintain its high profile.  Go to full article

Critic: conservation easements threaten Adirondack towns

Today, we continue our occasional series examining the rapid spread of conservation easements in the North Country. Over the last decade, pro-environment groups and the state of New York have bought easements on more than 700,000 acres of private land in the Adirondack Park. Many pro-environment groups see easements as one of their best tools for preserving ecosystems and open space. This summer, the Nature Conservancy announced the purchase of another 160,000 acres from the Finch, Pruyn timber company. But many local government leaders have expressed alarm about the easement movement. Fred Monroe is town supervisor in Chester and heads the Adirondack Park Local Government Review Board. Monroe told Brian Mann that the proliferation of massive conservation deals threaten to stifle economic development in small mountain towns that are already struggling to survive.

Program Note: Next week, we'll talk in-depth with Mike Carr, who heads the Adirondack Nature Conservancy. Carr is the architect of some of the biggest conservation purchases in North Country history, including the recent Finch, Pruyn deal.  Go to full article

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