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News stories tagged with "disease"

Culture of clostridium botulinum, which produces the botulism toxins. Photo courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory. Creative Commons. Some rights reserved.
Culture of clostridium botulinum, which produces the botulism toxins. Photo courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory. Creative Commons. Some rights reserved.

Botulism kills hundreds of loons in Lake Ontario

Type E Botulism, a disease caused by a toxic bacteria, is back in Lake Ontario. And over the last month or so, it's killed several hundred loons, ducks and other birds.

Type E Botulism has triggered annual bird kills in several Great Lakes since the late 1990s. But they've been largely minor on Lake Ontario for the last seven years. That is until residents around Henderson Harbor and Ellisburg in Jefferson County started calling the DEC in late October.  Go to full article

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Transmission cycle of Eastern Equine Encephalitis
Transmission cycle of Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Vermont combats Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Vermont is working to prevent the spread of Eastern Equine Encephalitis. Two cases have been reported so far, both on the western side of the state. One man died from the disease Tuesday.

Aerial spraying of insecticide is scheduled to begin in Addison and Rutland counties on Thursday night between 8 to 11 p.m. The health department encourages people to stay inside during the spraying, and to protect themselves against mosquito bites.  Go to full article
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.

Late blight confirmed in St. Lawrence County

Tomato and potato growers beware. Cornell Cooperative Extension has confirmed the first case of late blight in St. Lawrence County.  Go to full article
We're all humans, and not all of our employees are as healthy as they'd like to be.

Creating healthier workplaces

Did you make a New Year's resolution to lose weight or get more exercise? Some local small businesses are doing their part to help their employees stay healthy at the workplace. Wellness programs are not new. They've been staples at large companies for years, but are less likely to be used at small businesses. That's changing.

Amid soaring health spending, there is growing interest in workplace disease prevention and wellness programs to improve health and lower costs. Eager to control rising health care costs, small firms in St. Lawrence County are turning to a health experts for help. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article
Scientists say warmer temperatures could lead to increasing asthma rates and mosquito-borne diseases.
Scientists say warmer temperatures could lead to increasing asthma rates and mosquito-borne diseases.

Scientists: Climate change in New York could increase diseases

A new report finds that New York may suffer disproportionate effects of climate change in the coming decades, when compared with other regions. The report was co-authored by scientists from Cornell, Columbia University, and Hunter College. It finds that because New York is a northern state, it has already warmed more than twice the global average--2.4 degrees Fahrenheit in the last forty years.

The report paints a harsh picture, including possible extreme temperatures in the coming decades, along with sea-level rises, downpours, droughts, and floods. The changes are projected to affect nearly every region and every facet of New York's economy, including upstate ski resorts and dairy farms.

The report finds that the changing weather patterns will also affect public health. Co-author Patrick Kinney is director of Columbia University's Climate and Health Program. He spoke with Julie Grant about the diseases and other problems that could be in the north country's future.  Go to full article

Mosquitoes in the fall?

You might be enjoying the warm days this September - but experts say those high temperatures are also attracting some unwanted guests. Mosquitoes are usually gone for the year by now - but just walk outside at dusk, and you'll know they're still with us. Tim Mihuc is coordinator of the Lake Champlain Research Institute at Plattsburgh State. He with Julie Grant about how many mosquitoes might be out there, and why they're still bugging us.  Go to full article
Horticulturist Amy Ivy
Horticulturist Amy Ivy

Late blight vs. early blight, explained

Growers are nervous this summer as they hope late blight won't resurface in the North Country. The disease devastated tomato and potato crops across the Northeast last summer. David Sommerstein talks with Amy Ivy, horticulturalist for the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Clinton and Essex counties, for the latest on late blight. She says gardeners are confusing the disease with early blight and other, more common, diseases.  Go to full article

Trudeau hosts scientists studying the body's defenses

Researchers from around the world gathered in Saranac Lake over the weekend to talk about disease. The conference at Trudeau Institute focused on efforts to develop new vaccines, and a better understanding of the human immune system. As Brian Mann reports, the meeting was held against the backdrop of the growing swine flu pandemic.  Go to full article
Eithne McGuiness in "Typhoid Mary"
Eithne McGuiness in "Typhoid Mary"

Preview: ?Typhoid Mary? in Indian Lake

A hundred years ago, Irish immigrant Mary Mallon, on suspicion of carrying typhoid fever, was imprisoned and made news headlines in New York City. Todd Moe talks with actor Eithne McGuiness, who performs her one-woman play Typhoid Mary at the Indian Lake Theater Sunday night (7:30). It's the captivating story of a brave Irish peasant who fought tooth and nail for her freedom and took on the state of New York. McGuiness says the show explores the immigrant experience, discrimination and public health attitudes.  Go to full article

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