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News stories tagged with "dissolution"

Hermon, NY, seen from above by Google Earth. Image: maps.google.com
Hermon, NY, seen from above by Google Earth. Image: maps.google.com

Village of Hermon considers dissolution

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is encouraging smaller local governments to consolidate. And the St. Lawrence County village of Hermon may take him up on it. About 400 people live in the village, which is within the town of Hermon (pop. Around 1,100). The tiny village is beginning the process of deciding whether it makes sense to dissolve.  Go to full article
Victory Mayor Jim Sullivan. Photo courtesy James Sullivan
Victory Mayor Jim Sullivan. Photo courtesy James Sullivan

Village of Victory votes on dissolution

Residents in the Saratoga County village of Victory, New York, vote Tuesday on whether to dissolve the village government. Some North Country communities have recently considered dissolution, including Potsdam and Malone.

Victory has only 600 residents. They don't have police protection, so the major concerns are what happens to the fire department, garbage collection, and water rates.

30-year old Mayor James Sullivan ran on a dissolution platform four years ago.

He says if voters approve the dissolution, Victory will become part the town of Saratoga, and all those issues can be worked out over the next year or two.  Go to full article

Village of Chaumont ponders pros, cons of dissolution

Faced with increasing costs, aging equipment and the prospect of big tax savings for residents, the village of Chaumont is considering dissolution. But the issue isn't that clear-cut and has become a contentious subject, pitting neighbors and friends against each other in this small community. Joanna Richards reports.  Go to full article

Many questions unanswered as Potsdam Village nears dissolution vote

Next Tuesday, Potsdam village residents will vote on whether to dissolve the village. Potsdam isn't the only village to consider this--Budgets are tight and the state is offering incentives to eliminate layers of government.

Massena's looked into dissolution; and Waddington has decided not to pursue it for the moment. Malone's dissolution study committee met for the first time Wednesday night. Other villages in the region and state are moving through the process as well.

In Potsdam--a village of about 10,000 within a town of about 16,000-- arguments for and against dissolution turn on economic development, public safety, and of course, property taxes--but as Nora Flaherty reports, uncertainty may also play a very big role in how villagers vote:  Go to full article
People that live outside the current village aren't going to want to pay taxes to get my sidewalk plowed...they don't even have a sidewalk.

Waddington takes a small step toward dissolution

Waddington, population 736, is only one of several north country villages to consider dissolution. Massena, Potsdam and others have thought about it too--But Waddington's farther along in the process than some.  Go to full article

Villages consider - and reconsider - consolidation

This spring, residents of Potsdam will get their first look at a study of whether the village of Potsdam should disappear as a government body.

Governor Cuomo has said he wants to provide financial help for villages that consolidate into their surrounding towns.

Several other villages are also looking at the issue, including Mannsville in southern Jefferson County.

In 2009, a new law made it easier to dissolve local governments. But so far, every village that has voted on the issue has chosen not to dissolve. One exception is the village of Altmar in Oswego County. Reporter Dave Bullard explains the issue is more complex than it might seem.  Go to full article
Port Henry village seen from Lake Champlain. Source: port-henry.ny.us
Port Henry village seen from Lake Champlain. Source: port-henry.ny.us

Shutting down local governments complicated by bureaucracy, emotion

Next Tuesday, when most voters in the North Country are choosing new local government leaders, the residents of Port Henry will decided whether their village should exist at all. Other villages, from Lake George to Potsdam to Saranac Lake are considering similar measures. It is part of a statewide push to cut costs and reduce bureaucracy. But as Brian Mann reports, the decision also brings a sense of loss and even grief.  Go to full article

Local governments weigh the pros and cons of going out of business

Next week, voters in Port Henry in the Champlain Valley will decide whether to dissolve their village. If the ballot measure passes, local services would be provided in the future by the town of Moriah.

Today and tomorrow we'll be looking at local governments across the North Country that are thinking about merging or going out of business. The idea is being considered from Lake George to Potsdam to Saranac Lake. It's an effort to save money at a time when property taxes are a hotbutton issue and state aid from Albany is shrinking.

This morning, Brian Mann talks with Charles Zettek, with the Center for Governmental Research, a think-tank that helps local governments that are thinking about dissolving. Zettek served as a consultant to the village of Port Henry.  Go to full article

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