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News stories tagged with "dredging"

Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/45082883@N00/2716683773">Michael Sauers</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Michael Sauers, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Schumer wants feds to dredge 6 upstate harbors

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) Sen. Charles Schumer is asking the Army Corps of Engineers to fully dredge six upstate New York harbors that are eligible for Hurricane Sandy dredging money.

The Sandy appropriations cover dredging back to pre-storm conditions. But it's but not enough money to bring them to fully functional navigational channel depths.  Go to full article
Dredging operation on the Genessee River (in 2008). Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/45082883@N00/2716683773">Michael Sauers</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Dredging operation on the Genessee River (in 2008). Photo: Michael Sauers, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Dredging Upstate waterways and ports

Shipping lanes and ports along the Great Lakes are big contributors to the economies of upstate cities. Federal funding to remove sediment and keep these shipping lanes open is available, but funds are limited. One company has taken matters into their own hands in western New York.  Go to full article
Judith Enck, appointed regional director
Judith Enck, appointed regional director

NY's Enck appointed to top EPA post

Late last week, the Environmental Protection Agency announced that Judith Enck has been chosen as Regional Director for the district that includes New York state. That means she'll have oversight over environmental projects along the St. Lawrence Seaway, the dredging of the Hudson River - as well as dozens of smaller superfund sites across the North Country. Until this month, Enck served as Governor David Paterson's deputy secretary of the environment. She has also been an environmental activist in New York. Brian Mann spoke about Enck's appointment with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
The dredging operation on the upper Hudson unearthed 1700s-era timbers believed to be part of the original Fort Edward (Source:  EPA)
The dredging operation on the upper Hudson unearthed 1700s-era timbers believed to be part of the original Fort Edward (Source: EPA)

EPA faces hurdles, new controversy in Hudson dredging project

Three months after the Environmental Protection Agency began dredging toxic PCBs from the Hudson River, the project faces fresh criticism. The cleanup of industrial chemicals dumped in the river by General Electric is one of the largest and most complex environmental efforts ever undertaken in the U.S.

But many locals say too much pollution from the project is leaking back into the water and the air. They also worry that the dredging has damaged archeological sites along the river. Brian Mann reports from Fort Edward.  Go to full article
Dredging barges head for the river (Source:  EPA)
Dredging barges head for the river (Source: EPA)

Dredging begins on Upper Hudson after decades of PCB debate

After decades of research, litigation and political wrangling, General Electric is finally dredging tons of PCB-contaminated muck from the upper Hudson River. The first scoop was pulled from the river Friday morning. It's expected to be one of the biggest and most challenging environmental clean-ups in US history. This morning, Brian Mann has a special in-depth look at the battle over the future of the Hudson River.  Go to full article
General Electric discloses PCB spending
General Electric discloses PCB spending

GE Reveals Spending on PCB Dredging Fight

A group of religious investors led by a Roman Catholic nun says General Electric spent more than $120 million trying to block the clean up of toxic PCBs. GE disclosed the figures after years of pressure from activist shareholders. As Brian Mann reports, critics say the money should have been spent cleaning up the Hudson River and other polluted sites.  Go to full article
Erosion delta on English Brook (Lake George Association)
Erosion delta on English Brook (Lake George Association)

Lake George's Clean Water at Risk

Many people who live on Lake George still draw their drinking water directly from the shore. It's considered one of the cleanest big lakes in the country. But a new coalition of groups that met this week says accelerating development threatens that quality. As Brian Mann reports, storm-water erosion, sewage, and even road salt are changing the lake's chemistry.  Go to full article

EPA, GE May Work Together On Hudson Clean-up

After years of bitter fighting, General Electric and the Environmental Protection Agency are moving ahead with plans to dredge the Hudson River. GE is giving signs that it may work with the EPA - instead of filing legal action to block the clean-up. Federal officials are also offering compromise. Brian Mann has this update.  Go to full article

PCB Study Shows Proximity to Site Biggest Risk Factor

From the St. Lawrence to the Hudson Rivers and on land in between, the North Country has a number of PCB contaminated waste sites. Scientists have long believed that the greatest human risk these areas pose is when people eat PCB contaminated fish. A new study challenges that assumption. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
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image1cap

Conservatives Angered by Pataki Support of Hudson Dredging

The decision to dredge toxic PCBs from the Hudson River could help to shape the upcoming governor's race. Republican Governor George Pataki supported the clean-up, a move that will win support from many downstate voters. But Pataki's position has angered many upstate conservatives. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

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