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News stories tagged with "drones"

Trainees work on an MQ-9 Reaper at the Hancock field Air National Guard base near Syracuse, NY. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Trainees work on an MQ-9 Reaper at the Hancock field Air National Guard base near Syracuse, NY. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Crashed Air Force drone was flying with gear that couldn't handle cold

Besides some clouds on Nov. 12, 2013, Air National Guard crew members recalled to accident investigators that it was a nice day for flying.

But it was a cold, late fall day, just below freezing on the ground at Fort Drum, where the Air National Guard launches its remotely piloted aircraft for training missions over upstate New York.

A review of the Air Force's publicly released report into the accident has concluded the unmanned military drone that crashed into Lake Ontario that day was flying with equipment that didn't always function properly in cold weather.  Go to full article
Photo: Ryan Delaney/WRVO
Photo: Ryan Delaney/WRVO

Rome NY drone site gains funding

Upstate New York's new drone testing site is closer to pulling enough money together to begin operating. It's been awarded a state grant to cover some of its startup costs.

A state grant worth $600,000 has been given to NUAIR, the alliance of upstate defense contractors and universities that won approval to run one of six federal drone test sites. That's half of what's needed to begin operating the test site, which will be located at the former Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, New York.  Go to full article
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks in support of upstate New York becoming a federally designated drone testing site. Photo: Ryan Delaney, WRVO
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks in support of upstate New York becoming a federally designated drone testing site. Photo: Ryan Delaney, WRVO

Rome, NY drone test site OKed, but not funded

Upstate New York's successful bid to host one of the nation's drone testing programs came with the promise of millions of dollars in economic benefit to the region, but money to establish and operate the site itself is still needed.

Now the consortium behind the designation is reaching out to New York state.  Go to full article
A prototype drone from Propulsive Wing in Elbridge, N.Y. Photo: Ryan Delaney/WRVO
A prototype drone from Propulsive Wing in Elbridge, N.Y. Photo: Ryan Delaney/WRVO

Rome, NY to be federal drone testing site

Upstate New York has won a coveted test site designation for unmanned aerial systems - or drones - from the Federal Aviation Administration as part of that agency's work toward developing regulations for drones' integration into U.S. skies.

But for many in upstate New York, the designation is more about the jobs and dollars that surround the booming drone industry, estimated to be worth $100 billion globally over the next decade. Industry trade groups predict the business will generated 70,000 jobs nationwide.  Go to full article
Trainees work on an MQ-9 Reaper at the Hancock field Air National Guard base near Syracuse, NY. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Trainees work on an MQ-9 Reaper at the Hancock field Air National Guard base near Syracuse, NY. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Money to expand drone hangar at Fort Drum

Not long after a military drone crashed into Lake Ontario in November, the program that aircraft belonged to is getting a boost with funding from the 2014 defense spending bill signed into law last week. The money will go toward expanding a storage and maintenance facility at Fort Drum.  Go to full article

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Student crews work on the MQ-9 Reaper at the Hancock Field Air National Guard base near Syracuse, NY. Photo: David Sommerstein
Student crews work on the MQ-9 Reaper at the Hancock Field Air National Guard base near Syracuse, NY. Photo: David Sommerstein

Reaper drones to fly over Syracuse

Central New York's Air National Guard wing will soon be flying its drones over the city of Syracuse for training missions. The unit has had more airspace approved by the federal government.  Go to full article
Aeryon Scout in flight. Civilian drones such as this have been used to assist search and rescue activities. Photo: Dkroetsch, released to public domain
Aeryon Scout in flight. Civilian drones such as this have been used to assist search and rescue activities. Photo: Dkroetsch, released to public domain

How New York could benefit from drones

New York stands to be one of the country's biggest beneficiaries of the growth in the civilian drone industry expected over the next decade. A new study places the state in the top 10 list for the sector's expected economic impact.  Go to full article
Joe Kummer, president of Propulsive Wing in Elbridge, N.Y. demonstrates his prototype unmanned aerial vehicle.  Photo: Ryan Delaney/WRVO
Joe Kummer, president of Propulsive Wing in Elbridge, N.Y. demonstrates his prototype unmanned aerial vehicle. Photo: Ryan Delaney/WRVO

Why upstate communities want to be drone testing sites

A coalition of universities and defense contractors in upstate New York has submitted a bid to become a federal research and test site for drones.

The Federal Aviation Administration is working on regulations for the use of unmanned aircraft in American airspace by 2015.

To do that, the FAA will name six testing sites - and seeing economic opportunities, upstate New York wants to have one of those sites.  Go to full article
Gregory McNeal
Gregory McNeal

Writing the rules for domestic drone use

Drones are smaller, cheaper, and easier to use than ever, and their cameras are more powerful than ever.

In the near future, drones may be used to find criminals, track wildlife, or find a lost hiker in a remote canyon. They could also be used to look in places where we're not used to prying eyes.

Law professor Gregory McNeal studies the legalities of drone use at Pepperdine University in California. McNeal believes local government, not the courts, should lead the way in writing the rules in the drone era.

He says our notions of privacy may differ from what the law says. McNeal told David Sommerstein the Supreme Court has upheld the right of law enforcement to look for wrongdoing from a helicopter or plane.  Go to full article

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