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News stories tagged with "eagle"

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Conservation biologist Todd Katzner of West Virginia University shows off the Golden eagle's seven-foot wing span. (Photo by Nancy Eve Cohen)
Conservation biologist Todd Katzner of West Virginia University shows off the Golden eagle's seven-foot wing span. (Photo by Nancy Eve Cohen)

Golden eagle helps site wind turbines

After a farmer found an injured Golden eagle in New York this winter, wildlife veterinarians in Massachusetts treated the bird. And a biologist outfitted it with a GPS tracking device before releasing it in Connecticut. The goal is to map its migration north to Canada. The data is designed to help site wind turbines in places that are safe for these birds. WNPR's Nancy Cohen reports from a windswept hilltop where Golden eagle was released into the wild.  Go to full article

Owl Invasion Affords Close-Up Observation

Great Gray Owl invasions, also called "irruptions", happen about once every ten years. But this one is the largest on record. Brian Sullivan is the project leader of the website, ebird.org, at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology. Birders have posted Great Gray sightings from Minnesota to Montreal. Sullivan says it was only a matter of time until one was spotted in New York. Great Grays are one of the largest owls in North America, and they have a mysterious air about them. They're also known as the "Great Gray Ghost" and the "Phantom of the North". Sullivan told David Sommerstein despite those monikers, they're active during the day as well as night.  Go to full article

Cost of Taking Eagle Off Endangered Species List

With more than 7600 breeding pairs in the continental United States alone, the American Bald Eagle has made a remarkable comeback. A new proposal to remove the bird from the Endangered Species list is expected soon. But that means removing a powerful safety net that can affect future research, monitoring and habitat protection. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Sally Eisele reports.  Go to full article

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