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News stories tagged with "ecotourism"

Special Report: Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

The US Senate is expected to debate the country's energy plan this week. New York's senators oppose plans to drill for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. This special half-hour documentary report on ANWR was produced by Brian Mann.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 3

Alaska's arctic is a place of contrasts. For decades, the vast Prudhoe Bay oil fields have helped to feed the national economy. But the north slope also holds some of America's wildest--and most pristine--places. Brian Mann visited Alaska this summer. In this final part of his special series, Brian looks at two possible futures facing the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 2

Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is one of the most remote places on earth. The tundra plain also holds one of the last great deposits of crude oil in North America. If oil development goes forward in the Refuge, it could affect caribou and polar bears. But drilling would also reshape the lives of people who live and travel in the Arctic. Brian Mann spent a month Alaska this summer.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 1

After the terror attacks on September 11, the US House of Representatives voted to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil development. The plan is backed by President Bush, who says the oil would lessen America's reliance on the Middle East. The bill is stalled in the Senate. Democratic leaders say the measure would do little to foster energy independence. Many pro-environment groups claim that opening ANWR would destroy one of the world's great wilderness areas. Brian Mann traveled to the Arctic this summer and begins his special report.  Go to full article

Adirondack Park Visitors Centers: Reflecting a Political Landscape

For all its natural beauty, the Adirondack Park is a place defined by people. Towns and villages are scattered within the blue line. Laws and regulations protect the environment. As Brian Mann reports, the Adirondack Park Agency is working to reshape one of its Visitor Interpretive Centers. The idea is to bring the human element into sharper focus.  Go to full article

Study Values Adirondack Tourism

A new study by SUNY Potsdam professor John Omohundro concludes that hikers, paddlers, and mountain bikers contribute millions in tourist dollars to the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

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