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News stories tagged with "electoral-districts"

The only real path that Senate Republicans have to maintaining their majority into 2013 is for them to draw their own lines.

Redistricting the elephant in the room in Albany

One of the biggest issues facing state lawmakers in 2012 is the redrawing of electoral district lines.
New lines are drawn after every U.S. Census and typically reflect the political power structure of the state legislature, bolstering sitting majorities. As Karen DeWitt reports, the topic has been the elephant in the room during much of this year. Gov Andrew Cuomo has repeated threats to veto any lines that are gerrymandered and drawn in a partisan manner.  Go to full article
Republican State Sen. Betty Little (left), of Queensbury, and Patty Ritchie, Republican from St. Lawrence County, could see changes in their adjoining districts.
Republican State Sen. Betty Little (left), of Queensbury, and Patty Ritchie, Republican from St. Lawrence County, could see changes in their adjoining districts.

Redistricting could cut region's representation in Albany

There is a huge legal and political fight underway over how and where to count prison inmates when it comes time to draw New York State's political boundaries next year.

When Democrats briefly controlled the state Senate, they pushed through a bill requiring that roughly 60,000 prisoners be counted in their home districts.

If a legal challenge doesn't overturn the law, that could strip upstate districts of tens of thousands of people, forcing big changes in the shape of state Senate and Assembly districts.
Martha Foley talks with Brian Mann about why the North Country is vulnerable, and how the process may unfold.  Go to full article

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