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News stories tagged with "electricity"

Toronto, ON. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/msvg/5336969301/">Michael Gil</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Toronto, ON. Photo: Michael Gil, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

61,000 still without power in Ontario

Approximately 61,000 customers are still without power in Ontario, six days after the ice storm caused massive outages across the province.

In Toronto, about 48,000 customers are waiting for their power to be restored.  Go to full article

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Energy highway. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidou99/3879055515/">dtmi99</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Energy highway. Photo: dtmi99, CC some rights reserved

Will Cuomo blueprint solve NY's energy puzzle?

Late last year, the Cuomo administration laid out its agenda to address New York's future energy requirements. All this week, reporters from the Innovation Trail are putting different parts of that complex energy puzzle under the microscope.

In this first report, Matt Richmond examines the goals of that plan, known as the Energy Highway Blueprint.  Go to full article
A Con Edison crew works at the Alfred E. Smith Houses in lower Manhattan, on October 31.     Photo: Jason A. Howie, CC some rights reserved
A Con Edison crew works at the Alfred E. Smith Houses in lower Manhattan, on October 31. Photo: Jason A. Howie, CC some rights reserved

Cuomo calls for utility, regulation reform

When Gov. Andrew Cuomo delivers his annual State of the State message tomorrow, it will include proposals for greater oversight of state's electric utilities.
An investigatory panel created by Cuomo in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy recommends that the state's Public Service Commission be given more powers to regulate electric utilities and to impose higher monetary fines.  Go to full article
A portion of the proposed underwater power cable route. Image: TDI
A portion of the proposed underwater power cable route. Image: TDI

Big power line from Quebec to NYC draws fire

Opposition appears to be growing to a big new power line that would funnel electricity from hydro dams in Quebec to consumers in New York City. The $2 billion Champlain-Hudson Power Express would bury the cable under Lake Champlain and Hudson River.

The Toronto-based company developing the project hopes to have it online by 2016. But a growing number of critics say Canadian power would edge out producers in upstate New York and cost jobs on this side of the border.  Go to full article
A portion of the proposed underwater power cable route.
A portion of the proposed underwater power cable route.

NYS Senator says Lake Champlain power cable will stifle Upstate power

A State senator from Niagara county is pushing back against a plan to pipe more electricity from producers in Canada to consumers in New York City.

Senator George Maziarz says the big electricity transmission line planned to run under the water of Lake Champlain and the Hudson River would edge out power producers here in New York. Martha Foley has details.  Go to full article
Tim Helfter, Hopkinton, (center) has strong objections to the wind power project.
Tim Helfter, Hopkinton, (center) has strong objections to the wind power project.

Critical crowd greets wind company in Parishville

A skeptical public greeted wind power representatives Saturday in St. Lawrence County. Iberdrola Renewables says it's in "the earliest stages" of developing an industrial wind farm in the towns of Parishville and neighboring Hopkinton. As David Sommerstein reports, this weekend's open house puts the communities on a familiar - and contentious - path.  Go to full article

Sen. Griffo on education cuts, redistricting

New York's Senate passed a bill Tuesday that would make the Power For Jobs program permanent. The newly named "Recharge NY" program would double in size by using electricity that had been allocated to small residential energy bill discounts. It would still offer low-cost power to hundreds of companies across the state in return for job commitments. The new version of the program would also set aside $8 million to offer power discounts for farmers. The now goes before the state Assembly.

Republican Joe Griffo says the bill is one success in what he calls a "very hectic" session. Griffo says lawmakers are scrambling to finish budget bills while trying to avoid the "three-men-in-a-room" process that's given Albany such a bad name. "To debate these issues in public between both houses and hopefully arrive on a consensus so we can have an on-time budget," Griffo says. "I think everybody is trying to work together and do the best we can despite our philosophic differences."

Those differences include how much to cut education spending and how to make redistricting less partisan.

Griffo represents the 47th Senate district, which stretches from Utica in the south, though Lewis County and the eastern half of St. Lawrence County to Massena. He told David Sommerstein making the popular Power For Jobs program permanent is an important step forward.  Go to full article
Rupert River diversion was a massive industrial project rooted in Quebec's wilderness (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Rupert River diversion was a massive industrial project rooted in Quebec's wilderness (Photo: Brian Mann)

As Northeast looks to Hydro Quebec for power, thorny environmental questions remain

Northeast states are increasingly looking to Canada to meet a growing demand for low cost hydro electricity from renewable sources.

But the energy imports are stirring controversy. In northern New Hampshire, local activists are fighting a power line that would send the electricity south. And questions are being raised about whether big hydro is really green.

As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations John Dillon of Vermont Public Radio reports.

Northeast environmental reporting is made possible, in part, by a grant from United Technologies. Northeast environmental coverage is part of NPR's Local News Initiative.  Go to full article

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