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News stories tagged with "emerald-ash-borer"

Joanna Dean and Will Knight with a cross-section of a 154-year-old bur oak, cut to permit denser development despite protests from area residents.
Joanna Dean and Will Knight with a cross-section of a 154-year-old bur oak, cut to permit denser development despite protests from area residents.

Ottawa exhibit considers the "Urban Forest"

One city's relationship with trees is explored in a new museum exhibit in Ottawa.

Six moments in the history of an urban forest is the brainchild of Carleton University history professor Joanna Dean and graduate student Will Knight.

Present-day Ottawa began as rough riverside lumber shanties in the early 1800s. It grew to become the nation's capital, with various trends in tree clearing and tree planting along the way. More recently, the area has faced damage from natural disaster and invasive pests, like the emerald ash borer, which threatens perhaps 30% of Ottawa's existing tree population.

Although the display considers urban forestry from an Ottawa perspective, the challenge of combining trees with cities is universal. Lucy Martin spoke with co-curators, Joanna Dean and Will Knight on opening day at the Bytown Museum, beside the treed slopes of Parliament Hill.  Go to full article
Russell Martin checks an EAB trap last summer.
Russell Martin checks an EAB trap last summer.

Story 2.0: purple boxes part of losing battle to save ash trees

The purple boxes are up on ash trees again this summer. They're traps for the emerald ash borer, an invasive bug that has devastated ash stands in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio. In this state, the insect's been confined to western New York. Today we revisit the fight against the emerald ash borer. David Sommerstien has more.  Go to full article
Russell Martin, Newton Falls, and other DEC forest technicians have hung 2,500 EAB traps across the North Country.
Russell Martin, Newton Falls, and other DEC forest technicians have hung 2,500 EAB traps across the North Country.

Inside purple boxes, a trap for an invader

If you've driven almost anywhere in the North Country this summer, you've probably seen those purple boxes hanging by the side of the road. They're traps for an invasive bug that threatens to decimate New York's ash trees, about 8% of the state's forests. The emerald ash borer was found in New York two months ago, in the western New York town of Randolph. Federal and state environment officials destroyed that stand of ash trees. And they've hung more than 5,000 of the purple traps, half in the North Country, to see if they find any more emerald ash borers. So far, they haven't. Russell Martin is a forest technician for the Department of Environmental Conservation. He lives in Newton Falls and he's logged more than 12,000 miles in a Chevy Venture van setting and checking on the purple traps. David Sommerstein joined Martin on an expedition off Route 11 between Canton and Potsdam.  Go to full article

A new way to kill the emerald ash borer

Listen to the DEC's Russell Martin describe research about a kind of wasp that eats emerald ash borers, and may be used in the fight to save ash trees.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Emerald Ash Borer

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about the Emerald Ash Borer, the insect behind those purple traps we're seeing hanging from trees all over the North Country.  Go to full article
The Emerald Ash borer..
The Emerald Ash borer..

Ash-chewing beetle joins the list of invasives hitting New York

Last week, New York's Conservation Department announced that yet another invasive species has arrived in the state. This one, the Emerald ash borer, could be devastating. Millions of trees have already been ravaged by the tiny, green beetle, from Michigan to southern Canada. Brian Mann spoke with Robert Davies, head of the DEC Division of Lands and Forests.  Go to full article

"Devastating" invasive beetle threatens New York forests

Scientists in New York say a devastating new invasive insect called the Emerald Ash Borer has moved to within seventy-five miles of the state's border. The beetle has been confirmed in northern Pennsylvania, where a quarantine has been established on wood products in four counties. Officials with the Department of Environmental Conservation say as many as one in twelve trees in New York state could be threatened.  Go to full article

Tracking the ash borer

New York scientists have been watching for signs of the emerald ash borer since it was discovered in Detroit in 2002. Millions of ash trees have been destroyed in failed attempts to stop the spread. DEC researchers fear it's only a matter of time before it's found here. In 2005, Gregory Warner went to Syracuse for one field trip.  Go to full article

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