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News stories tagged with "emergency"

The "red zone" in downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec. NCPR File Photo: Brian Mann
The "red zone" in downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec. NCPR File Photo: Brian Mann

Clean-up, controversy follow Lac-Megantic disaster

The criminal investigation continues in eastern Canada, three weeks after a train disaster that police now say killed 47 people.

An unmanned train full of oil rolled free, derailed and then exploded in the heart of Lac-Megantic, a small rural town about three hours east of Montreal.

Civil lawsuits are already being filed here in the US - and there's a fight brewing over who will pay for the massive cleanup.  Go to full article
Keeping vigil and keeping watch at St. Agnes Church in Lac-Megantic. Photo: Brian Mann
Keeping vigil and keeping watch at St. Agnes Church in Lac-Megantic. Photo: Brian Mann

In Lac-Megantic, first steps toward normal

The official death toll in Lac-Megantic Canada has risen to 35, following the deadly train explosion earlier this month that flattened a big part of the community's downtown.

Now the rural Canadian town is making its first, painful steps toward recovery.  Go to full article
Lightning strikes triggered fire on Lyon Mountain. Photo: Mountain Lake PBS
Lightning strikes triggered fire on Lyon Mountain. Photo: Mountain Lake PBS

Lightning strike knocks out regional PBS station

Mountain Lake PBS, one of the North Country's biggest public television outlets, was off the air in many areas this morning because of a transmitter fire on the summit of Lyon Mountain in the Adirondacks.

The fire began Tuesday night after lightning struck transformers near the broadcast tower on the peak in Clinton County.  Go to full article
Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Larry Master
Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Larry Master

Emergency Adk tower plan worries bird experts

A plan to build and upgrade emergency communications towers on four summits in the Adirondack Park is sparking new controversy because of the possible impact on a rare songbird called the Bicknell's thrush. The thrush is a "species of concern" in New York, because of its dwindling population and its small, alpine breeding area.

Last winter, the Adirondack Park Agency set strict rules for the construction project, designed to limit any impacts on the songbird. But facing pressure from local leaders, the APA decided earlier this month to scrap those restrictions.

The last-minute change is drawing criticism from scientists and conservation groups that study Bicknell's thrush.  Go to full article
Tyler Hale, a firefighter in Cayuga Heights, tested leather and rubber boots to measure their effects on joint and muscle movement. Photo: Matt Richmond / WSKG
Tyler Hale, a firefighter in Cayuga Heights, tested leather and rubber boots to measure their effects on joint and muscle movement. Photo: Matt Richmond / WSKG

Researchers hope to make the job of first responders easier

New York State first responders have had plenty of opportunity to put their training to the test over the past two years during extreme weather events like Hurricane Sandy and Tropical Storms Lee and Irene.

The Innovation Trail's Matt Richmond reports on research that may make their challenging job easier, starting from the ground up.  Go to full article
Essex County's Emergency  Operations Center in the town of Lewis.  The new communication system will provide for modern two-way radio linkages, as well as microwave and high speed data lines. Photo courtesy Essex County
Essex County's Emergency Operations Center in the town of Lewis. The new communication system will provide for modern two-way radio linkages, as well as microwave and high speed data lines. Photo courtesy Essex County

APA approves new emergency communications system

The Adirondack Park Agency approved a new $16 million emergency communication system that will link first responders over a huge swath of the central and eastern Adirondacks.

APA commissioners voted unanimously to green light the project, which will mean improved communication for police, fire, and ambulance squads from Tupper Lake to Johnsburg to Elizabethtown.  Go to full article
Hudson River Rafting Company excursion on the upper Hudson in April 2008. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/csarva/">Chetan Sarva</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Hudson River Rafting Company excursion on the upper Hudson in April 2008. Photo: Chetan Sarva, CC some rights reserved

Hudson River guide pleads guilty after client drowns

A rafting guide from North Creek has pleaded guilty to criminal negligent homicide following the death of a client on a tributary of the Hudson River this fall.

Rory Fay of North Creek is expected to serve roughly a year behind bars after guiding a party while intoxicated.  Go to full article
Crews have already distributed 2,000 sand bags in the town of Jay ahead of Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Brian Mann
Crews have already distributed 2,000 sand bags in the town of Jay ahead of Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Brian Mann

Hurricane Sandy: Local, state officials scramble to prepare

Local governments and state officials scrambled through the weekend to prepare for the potentially devastating impacts of Hurricane Sandy.

Damaging winds and flood-level rains are expected to reach the North Country by mid-afternoon today.

After the "shock and awe" impact of tropical storm Irene last August, government agencies are taking no chances.  Go to full article
Photo:  NYS
Photo: NYS

Hurricane Sandy: Cuomo visits Adks ahead of storm

Sunday 3rdd Update: AUDIO FROM GOVERNOR'S SUNDAY ADDRESS ON LONG ISLAND.

Governor Andrew Cuomo today will visit the town of Jay fire hall in Ausable Forks as he reviews hurricane preparedness across New York state.

Earlier in the day, Cuomo mobilized more than a thousand National Guard soldiers to help prepare for the landfall of Hurricane Sandy.

"They will provide vital assistance to various regions of the State, and it is essential that they are positioned to be ready to serve wherever they are called," Cuomo said.

"These troops, along with critical equipment, vehicles and aircraft, are ready to answer at a moment's notice."

The National Weather Service is now predicting that high winds and heavy rains will hit the region beginning on Monday, with the blast expected to continue into Tuesday.

The advisory includes warnings for people in northern New York, Vermont, and particularly homeowners "with marine interests along Lake Champlain."

The current forecast suggests that foul weather will arrive Monday afternoon and will intensify through the night, tapering off late Tuesday morning.

A flood watch for that period is in effect. Winds are expected to peak between 5 pm and 3 am with gusts anticipated between 50 and 80 miles per hour.

Powerful winds are also expected in the St. Lawrence Valley.

Previously: Governor Andrew Cuomo on Friday declared a state of emergency in New York ahead of the landfall of Hurricane Sandy.

That means more resources available to local governments, and a suspension of many regulations "that would impede rapid response."

"As we prepare for the possibility of Hurricane Sandy hitting New York State, I am activating all levels of state government to prepare for any potential impacts," Governor Cuomo said, in a statement.

State officials have been coordinating with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Also, state Conservation officials issued an advisory late Friday urging all backcountry travelers in the Adirondack-North Country to be out of the woods by sundown on Sunday.

They also canceled reservations at the Fish Creek Campground near Saranac Lake next week.

The path of the storm remains unclear but local governments and state officials are taking pains to prep the North Country for a possible blast of foul weather.

With memories fresh from big storms and flood events last year, village officials in Saranac Lake say they're drawing down the level of Lake Flower.

"[T]he village began gradually lowering the level of Lake Flower two days ago and will do so more aggressively over the weekend," said village manager John Sweeney in a statement.

Local crews are also working to clear storm drains to prevent street flooding.  Go to full article
A surrounded home in Keene Valley. Photo: Sadie Holbrook.
A surrounded home in Keene Valley. Photo: Sadie Holbrook.

For Ausable River families, painful post-Irene decisions still have to be made

More than five months after tropical storm Irene sent floodwaters surging through the Adirondacks, families and communities still face some tough decisions.

Tomorrow night in the town of Jay, residents will meet with state and Federal officials to talk about a buy-out program that could help people relocate out of the flood plains along the Ausable and Boquet Rivers. The meeting to talk about the flood plain buy out program is scheduled for 7 pm tomorrow night at the Jay town community center in Ausable Forks.

More than sixty families in Essex County have expressed interest in the buy-out. Brian Mann checked in yesterday with Randy Douglas, town supervisor in Jay and head of the county's board of supervisors. Douglas says the number of people considering relocation continues to grow.  Go to full article

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