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News stories tagged with "emergency"

NY State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says people should be "vigilant" about price gouging during ice storm clean-up.  (NCPR file photo)
NY State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says people should be "vigilant" about price gouging during ice storm clean-up. (NCPR file photo)

Attorney General warns about ice storm price gouging

As people across the North Country move to clean up downed trees and frozen pipes from this week's lingering ice storm, New York's Attorney General is warning about price-gouging. Eric Schneiderman says it's illegal for companies to charge "excessive prices" following an emergency.  Go to full article
State trooper Bob Smith went door to door to check on residents possibly without power. Photo: David Sommerstein
State trooper Bob Smith went door to door to check on residents possibly without power. Photo: David Sommerstein

Facing ice & cold, first responders go door-to-door

Some 2,000 utility workers from across the Northeast struggled to restore electricity in Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties yesterday - even as ice-coated tree limbs kept pulling down power lines.

In St. Lawrence County, officials set up shelters in Gouverneur, Edwards, Colton, and Harrisville as residents braced for last night's sub-zero temperatures.

National Guard troops and state police went door-to-door to check on residents in the hardest hit parts of the county. David Sommerstein went along and has this report.  Go to full article
National Grid using my backyard as a fix it shop. Photo: David Sommerstein.
National Grid using my backyard as a fix it shop. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Power crews were prepared for an Ice Storm '98 repeat

While many remain without power, and some people have sought shelters, this storm wasn't as devastating as the Ice Storm of 1998. But residents - and the power companies - were preparing as if it could have been.  Go to full article
Flooding occurred as the West Branch of the Ausable rose more than six feet due to an ice jam. Photo: Larry Master
Flooding occurred as the West Branch of the Ausable rose more than six feet due to an ice jam. Photo: Larry Master

Clinton, Essex, Franklin brushed by ice storm

The weekend ice storm struck only a glancing blow in the eastern part of our listening area, including Clinton, Essex and Franklin Counties, as well as Quebec. Emergency alerts and travel bans were imposed as freezing rain hit on Sunday, but the area avoided serious accumulations of ice and saw few power outages.  Go to full article
Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester NY. If one of a doctor's patients is admitted, he'll get an alert. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/taudiophile/2793938059/">Aaron Giambattista</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester NY. If one of a doctor's patients is admitted, he'll get an alert. Photo: Aaron Giambattista, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Putting doctors in the loop when there's an emergency

Many health care providers don't know when their patients are admitted or discharged from hospital, or seen by an ambulance crew. That makes it harder to deliver comprehensive care.

The Rochester Regional Health Information Organization has set up a simple alert system that's aimed at changing that.  Go to full article
Scott Haworth, age 46, in a photograph distributed by the New York State Police
Scott Haworth, age 46, in a photograph distributed by the New York State Police

Body of missing hiker found in Keene

State police say the body of a hiker who vanished in the Adirondacks back in September has been located near a trailhead in the town of Keene.

An autopsy report found that Scott Haworth, from Chicopee, Massachusetts, took his own life.  Go to full article
The "red zone" in downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec. NCPR File Photo: Brian Mann
The "red zone" in downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec. NCPR File Photo: Brian Mann

Clean-up, controversy follow Lac-Megantic disaster

The criminal investigation continues in eastern Canada, three weeks after a train disaster that police now say killed 47 people.

An unmanned train full of oil rolled free, derailed and then exploded in the heart of Lac-Megantic, a small rural town about three hours east of Montreal.

Civil lawsuits are already being filed here in the US - and there's a fight brewing over who will pay for the massive cleanup.  Go to full article
Keeping vigil and keeping watch at St. Agnes Church in Lac-Megantic. Photo: Brian Mann
Keeping vigil and keeping watch at St. Agnes Church in Lac-Megantic. Photo: Brian Mann

In Lac-Megantic, first steps toward normal

The official death toll in Lac-Megantic Canada has risen to 35, following the deadly train explosion earlier this month that flattened a big part of the community's downtown.

Now the rural Canadian town is making its first, painful steps toward recovery.  Go to full article
Lightning strikes triggered fire on Lyon Mountain. Photo: Mountain Lake PBS
Lightning strikes triggered fire on Lyon Mountain. Photo: Mountain Lake PBS

Lightning strike knocks out regional PBS station

Mountain Lake PBS, one of the North Country's biggest public television outlets, was off the air in many areas this morning because of a transmitter fire on the summit of Lyon Mountain in the Adirondacks.

The fire began Tuesday night after lightning struck transformers near the broadcast tower on the peak in Clinton County.  Go to full article
Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Larry Master
Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Larry Master

Emergency Adk tower plan worries bird experts

A plan to build and upgrade emergency communications towers on four summits in the Adirondack Park is sparking new controversy because of the possible impact on a rare songbird called the Bicknell's thrush. The thrush is a "species of concern" in New York, because of its dwindling population and its small, alpine breeding area.

Last winter, the Adirondack Park Agency set strict rules for the construction project, designed to limit any impacts on the songbird. But facing pressure from local leaders, the APA decided earlier this month to scrap those restrictions.

The last-minute change is drawing criticism from scientists and conservation groups that study Bicknell's thrush.  Go to full article

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