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News stories tagged with "endangered-species"

Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Larry Master
Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Larry Master

Endangered status considered for Bicknell's thrush

The Fish and Wildlife Service says a rare songbird that nests atop mountains in the Adirondacks and Green Mountains may need protection as an endangered species. Todd Moe spoke with Long Lake birder Joan Collins, who has been tracking the Bicknell's Thrush for more than a decade. She says biologists are alarmed by the decline in the bird's numbers over the past year.  Go to full article
Male Spruce Grouse. Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Photo: Mdf, Wikipedia Commons
Male Spruce Grouse. Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Photo: Mdf, Wikipedia Commons

DEC unveils spruce grouse plan

State officials say they hope to save endangered spruce grouse, one of the most iconic birds in the Adirondack Park.  Go to full article
Are Federal researchers moving fast enough to protect infected bats? (Photo:  Greg Thompson/USFWS)
Are Federal researchers moving fast enough to protect infected bats? (Photo: Greg Thompson/USFWS)

Vermont green group wants bats threatened by 'white nose' syndrome added to endangered list

An environmental group based in Vermont says it plans to sue the federal government over its handling of white nose syndrome. That's the deadly disease that's been killing bats across the eastern US.

The Center for Biological Diversity hopes to pressure the Interior Department into adding two species of bats to the endangered species list.

As Brian Mann reports, that could mean changes to timber harvesting and other human activities in the forests where the bats spend their summers.  Go to full article
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)

"White-nose" syndrome kills Northeastern bats

Wildlife researchers across the Northeast are scrambling to understand a mysterious ailment that is killing thousands of bats, including rare Indiana bats, which are on the endangered species list. "White-nose" syndrome has been found at sites in New York and Vermont. And on Friday, scientists identified a new, infected cave in Massachusetts. The US Fish and Wildlife Service is now urging people to stay out of caves across the region. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Eels climb the new ladder. Photo: NYPA
Eels climb the new ladder. Photo: NYPA

Eels navigate new "ladder" at Massena power dam

There was encouraging news for eels yesterday. The New York Power Authority opened a new eel ladder to enable the threatened aquatic species to safely climb the Moses-Saunders Power Dam in Massena. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

Is Endangered Species Act Endangered?

The Endangered Species Act protects plants and animals that are on the brink of extinction. The American Bald Eagle and the Timber Wolf are examples of animals that have recovered because of the Act. But, some conservative members of Congress think the Endangered Species Act goes too far. They say the law often stands in the way of economic progress and private property rights. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mark Brush has this story.  Go to full article

Cost of Taking Eagle Off Endangered Species List

With more than 7600 breeding pairs in the continental United States alone, the American Bald Eagle has made a remarkable comeback. A new proposal to remove the bird from the Endangered Species list is expected soon. But that means removing a powerful safety net that can affect future research, monitoring and habitat protection. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Sally Eisele reports.  Go to full article

Canada Protects Endangered Species

Canada has a new law to protect endangered species. It is designed to protect more than 400 species and their critical habitat. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium?s Dan Karpenchuk reports.  Go to full article
Researcher Eric Britzky marks an Indiana bat roost tree.
Researcher Eric Britzky marks an Indiana bat roost tree.

Champlain Valley: Endangered Bats Colonize Private Land

Scientists in New York and Vermont say 5,000 endangered Indiana bats have colonized the Champlain Valley. The discovery confirmed this summer is good news for a species that's dying off in other parts of the country. But as Brian Mann reports, the bats are roosting on private land. That means new challenges for landowners and for researchers who hope to protect the species.  Go to full article

Scientists Call For Stronger Canadian Endangered Species Protection

More than 1300 US and Canadian scientists are asking the Canadian government to strengthen proposed legislation that would protect endangered species. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Kelly explains.  Go to full article

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