Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "entrepreneur"

New York State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli. Photo: Comptroller's office
New York State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli. Photo: Comptroller's office

Comptroller: NY looking to invest in more entrepreneurs

The state Comptroller says he's looking for more start up companies and entrepreneurs to invest in, as part of a partnership between the state's pension fund and private equity managers.  Go to full article
Gov. Cuomo, speaking at Clarkson University in Potsdam on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Photo: David Sommerstein
Gov. Cuomo, speaking at Clarkson University in Potsdam on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Photo: David Sommerstein

Cuomo: Business + universities = Economic Development

In Potsdam yesterday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo again pushed his new initiative to create 10 Innovation "Hot Spots."

They'd bring business and universities together to give start-up businesses support, access to venture capital and possibly tax breaks.

The "Hot Spot" idea would fall under Cuomo's larger strategy to boost the upstate economy: the Regional Economic Development Councils.  Go to full article
Author Ben Hewitt
Author Ben Hewitt

Lessons from "The Town That Food Saved"

Tonight and tomorrow, community leaders from around the region gather for the 9th Annual North Country Symposium. They'll try to learn lessons from a hardscrabble town in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont.

About ten years ago, people in Hardwick started opening businesses related to local agriculture. Today, there are community-supported restaurants, a tofu maker, a seed company, fruit, vegetable, and meat growers, a food coop, and a not-for-profit composting agency. Hardwick's been featured on national TV, in the New York Times, and many other newspapers.

Author Ben Hewitt wrote about the Hardwick revival in his book, The Town That Food Saved. He's the keynote speaker at the Symposium.

Hewitt told David Sommerstein part of Hardwick's success is owned to a spirit of collaboration and a diversified entrepreneurial economy.  Go to full article
They lack a commercial kitchen or facility that would allow them to make their product.

Potsdam mulls community "food incubator"

Small-time food entrepreneurs face a big obstacle in making anything from BBQ sauce to salsa for sale. Federal regulations require that food to be produced in a certified kitchen or processing facility. And most individuals can't afford to build their own.

Tomorrow at 3 o'clock, officials in Potsdam are hosting a meeting to consider building what they call a community "food incubator".

But village economic developer Jim Murphy says it would give a boost to artesanal food entrepreneurs. Murphy told David Sommerstein he's noticed a big increase in microloan applications from people who want to sell a food product.  Go to full article
Mary Gwyneth Holland (front) is using the web to sell her clothing to high-end clients.  Also pictured are Ruby Sprowls and Pam Rose of Boyden Brook Body Works.
Mary Gwyneth Holland (front) is using the web to sell her clothing to high-end clients. Also pictured are Ruby Sprowls and Pam Rose of Boyden Brook Body Works.

Local entrepreneurs seek markets online

Six year ago, then-Senator Hillary Clinton came to Clarkson University in Potsdam. She met local artisans and browsed their tables of handmade scarves and soaps and fishing rods. And she announced a new collaboration between Ebay, Clarkson, and the St. Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce to get those products to bigger markets.

The Northern Adirondack Trading Cooperative was born. It's since trained hundreds of local entrepreneurs in how to make websites and network and market online. A new 14-week course begins next Thursday at four locations across the North Country, in Canton, Malone, Watertown and Westport.

David Sommerstein talks with Ruby Sprowls, director of the Northern Adirondack Trading Cooperative, clothes designer Mary Gwyneth Holland from Colton, and Pam Rose, office manager of Boyden Brook Body Works in Canton.

To register for the class, call Ruby Sprowls at 315-386-4000.  Go to full article

1-5 of 5