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News stories tagged with "evolution"

Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin

Scientists celebrate Darwin's bicentennial

Next Thursday marks the 200th anniversary of evolutionary biologist Charles Darwin's birth. Darwin collected scientific data and was among the first to ponder the issue of how animals and plants change over long periods of time. This year is also the 150th Anniversary of the publication of his famous book, On The Origin of Species. Colleges and high schools around the region are hosting Darwin Day events, as part of a global celebration of science and reason. So, we invited two North Country biologists into the studio to ask where evolutionary theory is now, how it got there and the relevance of Charles Darwin today.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Seeing Evolution

Evolution as a theory has more going for it than sheer speculation. Darwin's ideas about how new species arise are supported, for example, by the recent development of a distinct species of marsh grass. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager look at the scientific evidence supporting evolution.  Go to full article
<i>Homo floresiensis</i>, left, and <i>Homo Sapiens</i>
Homo floresiensis, left, and Homo Sapiens

Natural Selections: Old "Hobbits"

Dr. Curt Stager and Marth Foley talk about a new hominid species, Homo floresiensis, whose 18,000-year-old remains have been unearthed on an Indonesian island. The diminutive stature of this close relative of modern humans has earned it the nickname "hobbit."  Go to full article

Natural Selections: origins of life

Natural Selections tackles questions about the origins of life--from a tree to an entire planet. How does life start? Are the beginnings biological, chemical or something else? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager wonder if we will recognize it when we see it.  Go to full article

Art and evolution: Forms Most Beautiful

One of the students in Kurt Stager's evolution class last year was artist Meg Bernstein. Bernstein used the ideas contained in Charles Darwin's theory and the abstract forms that she found in the fossil record to create a series of sketches, paintings, and sculptures that she calls "Forms Most Beautiful." Brian Mann attended the opening of her show last month at the Adirondack Artist's Guild space in Saranac Lake and talked with Meg about her work.  Go to full article
Bust of Neanderthal
Bust of Neanderthal

Natural Selections: Prehistoric Humans

What sort of evolution has taken place in the human species in the last 100,000 years? Is an evolutionary change always beneficial? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about Neanderthal and Cro-magnon Man.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Trout variations, pt. 2

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager continue a discussion about trout biology and habitat in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Trout variations

Native brook trout developed in genetically isolated communities, producing variations from one watershed to the next. Through human interventions such as stocking programs and lakeside and streamside development, those distinct communities have been lost in many areas. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss some restoration efforts.  Go to full article

Evolution debate alive in Chazy theater

Elections for the Kansas state board of education this week centered on a furious debate over evolution, Darwinism, and biblical creationism. The fight over science and faith continues to rage in America. This weekend at the Chazy Central Rural School, a local theater company will stage a production of Inherit the Wind. Brian Mann spoke with director Andrew LaFontaine. He says the debate over Darwin's theory has proved much more enduring than the play's authors expected.  Go to full article
Sickle cell anemia may be an adaptation to malaria.
Sickle cell anemia may be an adaptation to malaria.

Natural Selections: Malarial Coevolution

Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley talk about malaria, the pandemic killer of the tropics, thought by biologists to be an example of coevolution in action. While the protozoan that causes the disease evolves to survive treatment and eradication measures, humans evolve at the same time to cope with the ravages of the disease.  Go to full article

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