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News stories tagged with "fall"

Last chance for planting garlic bulbs. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/34167928@N05/3583522970/">artefatia</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Last chance for planting garlic bulbs. Photo: artefatia, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Last call for fall garden chores

With a mix of snow and rain in the forecast this week, horticulturist Amy Ivy says this is really the last week for getting bulbs - garlic, tulip - in the ground this season. Amy also spoke with Todd Moe about putting the lawn to bed for the winter.  Go to full article
Adirondack biologist Nina Schoch bands a Saw-Whet Owl near Lake Placid during fall migration.  Photo:  Costa Boutsikaris.
Adirondack biologist Nina Schoch bands a Saw-Whet Owl near Lake Placid during fall migration. Photo: Costa Boutsikaris.

Fall migration's special rewards

The fall migration is underway, a great time for birders to be outdoors watching the skies and treetops. Todd Moe spoke with Lake Placid bird watcher Larry Master about what he's seeing on his farm: lots of sparrows and finches. It's also a great season for up-close-and-personal views of birds -- Master is hosting a crew of birders busy banding Saw-Whet owls this week.  Go to full article
Wild grapevine tendrils. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/knitsteel/3010568605/">Kristen Skiles</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Wild grapevine tendrils. Photo: Kristen Skiles, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Short-term gain in the yard-work department

There's a lot to be said for the burst of energy that leads a person to whack down the tangle of wild grapevines, or blackberries, or box elders that's used the past summer to take over some corner of the yard.

It feels good to clean all that stuff out. But according to Cornell Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy, the gain, and probably the satisfaction, will be short-lived. It may be worth it, but some strategic planning can help extend the benefits.  Go to full article
Early October, and time to clean out the perennials! Photo: Martha Foley
Early October, and time to clean out the perennials! Photo: Martha Foley

Fall chores to do, and not to do...yet

First: it isn't time to plant garlic yet, according to Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy. She says October 1 used to be the time-post for planting garlic, but the end of October is now the accepted date.

There are plenty of other chores to fill a gardener's time, however. Cleaning out the perennial beds, moving some things with extra care are all on the list in this week's conversation.  Go to full article
Lauren and Robert Miller, at the farm in Lombardy, Ontario. Photo by Lucy Martin
Lauren and Robert Miller, at the farm in Lombardy, Ontario. Photo by Lucy Martin

Work trumps water skiing at Miller's Bay Farm

Lake country west of Perth, Ontario is dotted with a mix of woodland, rural homes and farms. Overlooking Rideau Lake you'll find Miller's Bay Farm Market Garden and Berry Patch.

Robert and Shannon Miller are raising their four children there, hoping to carry small-scale local agriculture into a 4th generation. The Millers farm about 350 acres - more or less, depending on what's in hay that year.

Lucy Martin tagged along on a group tour a couple of weekends ago.  Go to full article
With cold nights and sunny days bright fall foliage is finally here. Archive Photo of the Day: Patricia Lincourt.
With cold nights and sunny days bright fall foliage is finally here. Archive Photo of the Day: Patricia Lincourt.

How to help plants survive a frost or two

Scattered frost doesn't necessarily mean the end of the vegetable garden. Some tender leafy plants won't survive (basil, winter squash...), and fruits like tomatoes and eggplant won't ripen in such cool weather, but some things will flourish (kale, brussell sprouts...).

And it may be worth protecting others now, with more sunny, warm-ish weather to come. Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy is protecting her zinnias, and enjoying cold-friendly crops. She shares tips with Martha Foley.

And... it's happening! Time to get out and see the fall colors.  Go to full article
<em>Harmonia axyridis</em>, the Japanese Lady Beetle, has almost completely displaced the native variety. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobstone/">Bob Stone</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Harmonia axyridis, the Japanese Lady Beetle, has almost completely displaced the native variety. Photo: Bob Stone, CC some rights reserved

Balmy days bring bugs inside

It's the last full week of October, but it looks as though the North Country will be enjoying another several days of warm temperatures and sunny skies: good weather for enjoying the outdoors and finishing up fall chores.

But as Cornell Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley, the late season warmth brings unwelcome insects inside. Cluster flies and ladybugs lead the list of bugs that commonly turn up inside this time of year. They're annoying she says, but not dangerous to humans or homes. The best thing to do? Sealing up the windows and woodwork to keep them out.  Go to full article
These leaves are lovely on the tree, and a valuable resource for gardeners once they're on the ground. Photo: Brian Mann
These leaves are lovely on the tree, and a valuable resource for gardeners once they're on the ground. Photo: Brian Mann

Many reasons to cherish the fallen leaves

This year's brilliant fall color display is fast giving way to the second annual leaf event: Raking season.

Few people will say raking is their favorite outdoor chore. But in their weekly conversation, Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley there are plenty of reasons to cherish those fallen leaves, and more than one way to deal with them.  Go to full article
Healthy porcelain garlic.
Healthy porcelain garlic.

Fall gardening: not quite time for garlic

Acccording to Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy, the old rule said the first two weeks of October were perfect for planting garlic. But not any more.

The best time to plant garlic in the North Country is now the last two weeks in October, according to Ivy.  Go to full article
Photo: Martha Foley
Photo: Martha Foley

Flirting with frost: what to pick, what to protect

It's officially fall, and practically speaking, frost advisories put fall chores at the top of a gardener's mind. But what to do? Is it worth the covering tomatoes? Will the winter squash survive a touch of frost? And what about flowers?

Cornell Cooperative extension horticulturist Amy Ivy sorts through some of the priorities in her weekly conversation with Martha Foley.

(Hints: "maybe" on the tomatoes, "no" on the winters squash's prospects.)  Go to full article

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