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News stories tagged with "family"

SPJ Winner: Dying inmates in NY struggle to get home

This spring North Country Public Radio's news team has been honored with several awards for some of the work we've brought you over the past year. Much of that recognition has gone to our Prison Time Media Project, which over the year and a half has been looking in-depth at the growth of the prison industry here in our region, across New York and around the country.

Tonight in Washington DC, one pair of investigative reports from the Prison Time project will be honored by the Society of Professional Journalists. In her two-part series, Natasha Haverty looked at how the soaring numbers of men and women behind bars for low-level crimes over the past few decades have effected the life cycle--asking questions like, "what happens when a woman enters prison pregnant?" and "what systems are in place for when an inmate ages, or gets fatally ill?"

This morning, we'll revisit one of those reports, and learn how despite recent reforms to the system, many terminally ill inmates are forced to remain behind bars even when they no longer appear to be a threat to society. Even some prison officials think the process for allowing inmates to die at home needs fixing.  Go to full article
Third generation co-owner Peter Depthereos in front of The Crystal. Photo courtesy of TAUNY
Third generation co-owner Peter Depthereos in front of The Crystal. Photo courtesy of TAUNY

Watertown's oldest restaurant faces eviction deadline

Last week, the North Country learned that one of its iconic places to eat has been served an eviction notice. The Crystal, Watertown's oldest restaurant, opened its doors more than 90 years ago, and since the '40s, it's been run by the Dephtereos family.  Go to full article

Dying inmates in NY struggle to get home

This year, North Country Public Radio has been looking in-depth at the growth of the prison industry here in our region, across New York and around the country.

Over the last four decades, we've seen the number of men and women behind bars soar--many serving long mandatory sentences for low-level crimes.

And one side-effect of those tough-on-crime policies today is that the number of elderly inmates is surging--growing by almost eighty percent from 2000 through 2009.

Prison officials across the US are struggling to sort out what that means, how we think about and care for inmates who grow old and die in our prisons.

In part one of our investigative report, Natasha Haverty found that despite recent reforms to the system, many terminally ill inmates are forced to remain behind bars even when they no longer appear to be a threat to society. Even some prison officials think the process for allowing inmates to die at home needs fixing.  Go to full article
Watertown City Council meeting on March 4, 2013. Watertown mayor Jeff Graham, presiding,  voted against making changes to the city's zoning code that essentially aimed to ban roommates. Photo: <a href="http://www.steveweedproductions.com/WCC2013.php">still from City Council video.</a>
Watertown City Council meeting on March 4, 2013. Watertown mayor Jeff Graham, presiding, voted against making changes to the city's zoning code that essentially aimed to ban roommates. Photo: still from City Council video.

Watertown catches flack for "roommate ban"

The Watertown City Council has gotten a lot of pushback and even ridicule in the media recently for passing what's being referred to as a "roommate ban." Last month, in response to a neighbor dispute, the City Council removed language from the zoning code that allowed the renting out of rooms in single-family homes. But city planning officials say the regulatory change is completely unenforceable.  Go to full article
Jemila Saleh in her kitchen in Potsdam. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Jemila Saleh in her kitchen in Potsdam. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Eritrean refugee finds home in cooking

Eritrea is a small country in the African Horn. It's been at war on and off with neighboring Ethiopia for decades. And since 2001, the government has been sending thousands of its citizens to prison for being a part of any faith group that isn't on the government's approved list of churches.

Jemila Saleh is sure she would have been sent to prison for her beliefs, if it hadn't been for a series of what she calls miracles. Just after her pastor was imprisoned, Jemila connected with a church here in the North Country, and they offered to support her escape. So in the middle of the night Jemila packed up all she could, and got on airplane with her three daughters. Members of the church picked them up at the Syracuse airport with a backseat full of blankets and winter coats, and brought them to their new apartment in Potsdam, which the church members had rented and furnished.

Four and a half years later, Jemila has a degree in finance from SUNY Canton, her daughters are in school, and Jemila is practicing her faith freely here. But the way she's kept a grip on her life, and her story, is through cooking.  Go to full article
Madeleine Kunin in her Burlington home
Madeleine Kunin in her Burlington home

Women and the Workplace: An interview with Madeleine Kunin

Discussion of women in the workplace was reinvigorated several weeks ago when Democrat Hilary Rosen chastised presidential candidate Mitt Romney's wife, Ann Romney, for--quote--"not working a day in her life." That set off another round of "mommy wars": sharp discussion of whether women are better off working to provide for their families or staying home with their children. And it raises an important question - why, 40 years after the women's movement, it's still so difficult for women to balance their families and their jobs.

Madeleine Kunin was Vermont's first female governor in 1985. She's now 78 years old and has published a new book - "The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the next revolution for women, work, and family." The book issues a clarion call for women, men, businesses, and government to make sure that workplace and family rights for women top their agendas.

Sarah Harris spoke with Kunin about her book.

Correction: Madeleine's age was initially reported as 79. She is in fact 78 years old.  Go to full article
Tim Morse loved life in Chicago, where attractions like the Cloud Gate sculpture are all around (Photos provided)
Tim Morse loved life in Chicago, where attractions like the Cloud Gate sculpture are all around (Photos provided)

Vanishing Youth: Why do some young people stay?

This week, we're beginning an on-going series looking at the future of the North Country from the perspective of young people. New research from Cornell University shows counties in our region continuing to age, with fewer young families, fewer young professionals and fewer kids.

In the weeks ahead, we'll be looking at this problem from a lot of different angles. Today, Brian Mann talks with Tim Morse, a North Country native who made a different choice, returning and making a career in the region.

Tim, who is 26 years old, arrived back home earlier this month, leaving Chicago to take a job at SUNY Potsdam. He spoke with Brian right after getting off the road.  Go to full article
Nathan Hoskins
Nathan Hoskins

Finding peace after cruelty

A Kentucky man who survived childhood abuse and learned to forgive will share his story with audiences in Canton and Potsdam.

You might remember Nathan Hoskins' StoryCorps segment that aired a few months ago on Morning Edition. In it, he tells a friend how his family first learned that he was gay and how he was held at gunpoint by his mother. Since then, Hoskins has traveled the country speaking to community and college groups about his painful childhood and his resolve to fulfill his dreams.

Todd Moe spoke with him about "coming out" to his family and the response he's received since his StoryCorps interview aired on NPR.

Nathan Hoskins will share his story of surviving childhood abuse this Sunday at 7 pm at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Canton and again Monday at 6 pm at SUNY Potsdam in Kellas Hall, Room 103. Everyone is invited to both presentations, but the program is not suitable for young audiences.  Go to full article
Linda Barberic's partner Keith helps her prepare a healthy meal, using olive oil instead of butter. (Photo by Julie Grant)
Linda Barberic's partner Keith helps her prepare a healthy meal, using olive oil instead of butter. (Photo by Julie Grant)

Trying for a healthy Thanksgiving

With so many Americans facing diabetes, heart disease, and other health problems, the Thanksgiving meal has become a battleground in some families. Some family members want to make it a healthy meal, others want to stick with their traditional family dishes. Julie Grant reports:  Go to full article
An image from Dave Beck's "Logjam" 3D animation.
An image from Dave Beck's "Logjam" 3D animation.

Art that explores a river, infinity and new ideas

A Clarkson University artist spent this summer in Minnesota studying a river, the logging industry and the human element. Dave Beck directs the Digital Arts and Sciences Program at Clarkson University. His new show, titled "Continuation," includes sculpture, video and a 20-foot tall projected 3D animation. Beck was an artist-in-residence at the Science Museum of Minnesota and worked with biologists and park rangers to gather images, video and data on the St. Croix River. But he says the exhibit also connects with his hiking and paddling experiences in the Adirondacks. The show opens Thursday in the Gibson Gallery at SUNY-Potsdam. Todd Moe toured the exhibit with Beck and gallery director April Vasher-Dean.  Go to full article

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