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News stories tagged with "farm-bill"

Congressman Bill Owens and Richard Eakins talk about corn storage. Photo: Sarah Harris.
Congressman Bill Owens and Richard Eakins talk about corn storage. Photo: Sarah Harris.

Owens: farm bill may happen in 2013

There's still no Farm Bill this year.

The Farm Bill sets policy for agriculture nationwide. But most of the bill--money-wise--goes to food stamps. And disagreement over cuts to food stamps has held the overall bill up for over a year.

This week, members of the House and Senate will start hashing out a new compromise version of the bill. At a visit to a North Country soybean farm, Congressman Bill Owens said that may mean progress.  Go to full article
U.S. Rep. Bill Owens
U.S. Rep. Bill Owens

Owens seeks compromise on farm bill

This week the Senate passed a five-year, nearly $500 billion farm bill. About three-quarters of that pays for the food stamp program, which would be cut by $400 million a year. Direct farm subsidies are largely replaced by subsidies for crop insurance. And there are a barrelfull of other items from land conservation to support for young farmers.

This is pretty much where things stood a year ago. But House Speaker John Boehner refused to let his chamber's version of the farm bill come to the floor for a vote. Conservative Republicans believed the bill contained too much government spending.  Go to full article
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY). Photo: Mark Kurtz
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY). Photo: Mark Kurtz

Gillibrand wants food stamps, milk price reform in Farm Bill

Congress is back to work on a new five year Farm Bill. The Senate passed one last year, but the House of Representatives couldn't agree on the size of cuts to the food stamp program and other issues.

New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand says preserving food stamps is "a moral issue." And she says there's a way to pay for them.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews feeds the heifers in his barn in Fowler. Photo by David Sommerstein.
Bob Andrews feeds the heifers in his barn in Fowler. Photo by David Sommerstein.

Gillibrand pushes ways to preserve small dairy farms

The US Senate is preparing to take up the federal Farm Bill again in the coming weeks.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand wants it to include a plan to protect and encourage New York's dairy farms, especially smaller farms.  Go to full article
A sapbucket at Newton's Sugarbush. One of the bills US Rep. Owens is introducing would make it easier for producers to tape trees on some state and conservation lands in the Adirondacks. Photo: Todd Moe
A sapbucket at Newton's Sugarbush. One of the bills US Rep. Owens is introducing would make it easier for producers to tape trees on some state and conservation lands in the Adirondacks. Photo: Todd Moe

Owens gets ahead of curve on farm bill

Washington failed to pass a Farm Bill last year. Congressman Bill Owens says he's "cautiously optimistic" one will pass this year. But he's not sure exactly what will be in the massive $100 billion a year legislation that funds everything from farm programs to food stamps.

So the North Country Democrat is introducing three bills early that would help New York farmers.  Go to full article
Photo of the Day archive: Whit Haynes
Photo of the Day archive: Whit Haynes

Owens a reluctant "yes" on Farm Bill extension

Tucked into the fiscal package passed by Congress last night is a nine-month extension of the farm bill. The massive five-year farm bill expired last fall when the House wouldn't vote on a new version passed by the Senate.

This extension includes a safety net for dairy farmers. But it axes many popular programs.  Go to full article
Dairy cows at Greenwood Dairy, in Canton, NY. Photo: Nora Flaherty
Dairy cows at Greenwood Dairy, in Canton, NY. Photo: Nora Flaherty

Updated: Senate passes limited Farm Bill extension

Updated 3:25pm: The Senate passed a limited nine-month extension of the 2008-2012 farm bill. It avoids the "dairy cliff" (see below) and preserves the older MILC dairy price support program. But it cuts many popular programs, including disaster insurance, conservation, and organic certification support.

Read this blog post at our new farm and food blog, The Dirt, for the latest:

http://blogs.northcountrypublicradio.org/thedirt/2013/01/01/farm-bill-update-many-disappointed-farmers/

The US Congress failed to pass a new Farm Bill by the end of the year. But that doesn't mean milk prices are going to double immediately, as some had feared.

The House and Senate Agriculture Committees had a deal in place Monday to extend the 2008 farm bill for another nine months. But the agreement never came to the House floor for a vote. House leaders balked at a new safety net for dairy farmers that would restrict the milk supply if prices fell below a certain level.  Go to full article
2012 moves into the rear-view mirror. Archive Photo of the Day: Lizette Haenel.
2012 moves into the rear-view mirror. Archive Photo of the Day: Lizette Haenel.

2012: Looking back at the year in North Country news

What would a New Year's Eve be without a look back at the old year?

NCPR's two veteran reporters, Brian Mann and David Sommerstein, joined Martha Foley to consider the big stories of 2012, most of which are already projecting their influence into the coming year.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews feeds the heifers in his barn in Fowler. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Bob Andrews feeds the heifers in his barn in Fowler. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Dairy farmers fear own "fiscal cliff"

One big item caught up in gridlock created by the current budget debate, with its "fiscal cliff" threat, is the federal farm bill.

Most farmers are still covered by crop insurance and other programs until next planting season, but that's not true of dairy.

Dairy farmers now have no safety net if milk prices fall. And with feed prices soaring, many feel they're falling off a cliff of their own.  Go to full article

What's out - and what's next - for the farm bill

Yesterday when you woke up, you may not have felt different. But farm country did. The federal farm bill expired because Congress wasn't able to pass a new one by the September 30th deadline.

The farm bill is huge. It funds everything from food stamps to wetlands restoration to school nutrition - in addition to helping to pay for commodities like corn, soybeans, milk, and cheese.

So now that there's no farm bill, it's hard to know what's changed. David Sommerstein joins us to sort through it all.  Go to full article

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