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News stories tagged with "farmers"

Loretta Lepkowski's <i>The Cow with the Golden Tail</i>, a pastel of Eric Sherman and Carl.
Loretta Lepkowski's The Cow with the Golden Tail, a pastel of Eric Sherman and Carl.

Old Forge Library exhibit highlights Tug Hill family farms

Lewis County artist Loretta Lepkowski's exhibit, Farming and Folks of the Tug Hill and Adirondack Region, is on display at the Old Forge Library this month. She says the inspiration for her narrative paintings comes from growing up on a southern Lewis County farm.  Go to full article

A late winter bite of local food

An open house featuring local farmers and a community dinner in Plattsburgh on Saturday, March 3 will showcase local produce, meat and dairy products. Horticulturist Amy Ivy, with Cornell Cooperative in Clinton and Essex counties, tells us more about the second annual "Food from the Farm" event.

She told Todd Moe she's hoping it will energize consumers about this year's growing season and buying locally grown food in the late winter months.

For dinner tickets, call: 518-561-7450, or email: adi2@cornell.edu  Go to full article
Young farmers gathered near Tarrytown, NY in 2009.
Young farmers gathered near Tarrytown, NY in 2009.

Young farmers connect, ready to grow

Last summer we produced a series on the new generation of North Country farmers. This week we'll take a second listen to some of the highlights of the series, Farmers Under 40.

Two years ago about a hundred young farmers gathered in Tarrytown, New York and came up with the idea of creating an organization to support young people wanting to work the land and make a living off of it. They named the group the National Young Farmers Coalition. One of its co-founders is Severine von Tscharner Fleming. She manages Smithereen, a 100-acre farm on rented land in the Hudson Valley.

According to the USDA, the average age of the American farmer is 57. Von Tscharner Fleming says young farmers--descendents of traditional farmers, inner-city gardeners, homesteaders, college graduates and ex-suburbanites--face tremendous structural obstacles like access to land, capital, education, and business training. She told Todd Moe that one of the principle ideas behind the coalition is that if the country wants active farms and sustainable food production in fifty years, the next generation needs help.  Go to full article
Young farmers gathered near Tarrytown, NY in 2009.
Young farmers gathered near Tarrytown, NY in 2009.

Young farmers connect, ready to grow

Two years ago, about a hundred young farmers gathered in Tarrytown, New York and came up with the idea of creating an organization to support young people wanting to work the land and make a living off of it. They named the group the National Young Farmers Coalition. One of its co-founders is Severine von Tscharner Fleming. She manages Smithereen, a 100-acre farm on rented land in the Hudson Valley. We'll hear from her in just a moment.

According to the USDA, the average age of the American farmer is 57. Von Tscharner Fleming says young farmers--descendents of traditional farmers, inner-city gardeners, homesteaders, college graduates and ex-suburbanites--face tremendous structural obstacles: access to land, capital, education, and business training. She told Todd Moe that one of the principle ideas behind the coalition is that if the country wants active farms and sustainable food production in fifty years, the next generation needs help.  Go to full article
Ater readies the tractor and transplanter.
Ater readies the tractor and transplanter.

Grown up and growing food on their own

This week we begin a series of stories and conversations about the next generation of farmers in the North Country. We're calling it "Farmers under 40". They're young, energetic and willing to make sacrifices to be part of the farmer-foodie culture.

Community Supported Agriculture, or "CSA", is a growing trend across the region with people who like to know where their food is grown and that it's fresh. It's like subscription agriculture. Members join before the growing season begins, giving the grower the money to buy seeds and supplies. They also share in the farm's seasonal bounty.

One such CSA, Fledging Crow Vegetables, is run by Ian Ater and Lucas Christenson. Todd Moe recently visited their small farm just outside of Keeseville, south of Plattsburgh. Chances are you've seen the Fledging Crow booth at a farmers' market in the Adirondacks or Champlain Valley this summer. Ater and Christenson are both college educated, but growing and peddling spinach, lettuce, tomatoes and carrots wasn't in their early career plans. Now in their late-20's, the two friends are committed -- physically and financially -- to dirt, sweat and feeding the North Country.  Go to full article
Organizer Severine von Tscharner Fleming, photo courtesy of Cathryn Kramer
Organizer Severine von Tscharner Fleming, photo courtesy of Cathryn Kramer

Motley crew of farmers celebrates a passion for the land

Beginning farmers from both sides of Lake Champlain gathered at the Grange Hall in rural crossroads of Whallonsburg in late June for a sort of mixer.

The mixer was organized by the Greenhorns, a nonprofit group that works on behalf of young farmers. The day included area farm tours, workshops, food, a puppet show, and camaraderie. Typical old grange-style stuff. But it wasn't farm business as usual.

Sarah Harris found the young farmers there are on a mission to change agriculture in America.  Go to full article

Growing fruits and veggies in the city

For decades, people in cities have relied on farmers in rural areas to grow the fruits and vegetables we eat. But a new generation of farmers says there's no reason to keep agriculture out of the urban core. Ann Dornfeld reports.  Go to full article

Peer pressure fighting farm pollution

Farm pollution is the biggest water contamination problem in the nation. But government agencies often struggle to get farmers to change to less polluting farming methods. Many farmers say they don't want outsiders telling them what to do. Rebecca Williams reports on one grassroots project in the Midwest that's trying to encourage farmers to change, with peer pressure.  Go to full article
Bill Smith and Don Woodcock
Bill Smith and Don Woodcock

Preview: Warm stories for a Chili Night

Storyteller Bill Smith and champion fiddler Don Woodcock present an evening of stories and music at the Unitarian-Universalist Church in Canton Saturday night. A chili dinner starts at six and music and stories begin at 7 o'clock. All the proceeds benefit Heifer International and the work it does globally and locally. Todd Moe talks with Heuvelton farmer Brian Bennett who will give a presentation Saturday night on the Northern New York Farmers Partnership.  Go to full article

Snow doesn?t slow farm chores

People across the country are fascinated by the recent snow squalls off Lake Ontario. It's the stuff of big, bold headlines and top stories on TV - and radio - newscasts. But locals brush off the snow and get on with life. It is the North Country, after all, and people up here take a certain pride in their ability to soldier on. Scott Markham is doing just that. He's the manager of the Markham Dairy near Constableville in southern Lewis County - not too far from the Blue Line. He's responsible for about 350 head of cattle and daily milking of almost 200 cows. Jonathan Brown asked him how much snow he's seen pile up.  Go to full article

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