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News stories tagged with "farmers-markets"

Root crops at the Glens Falls Farmers Market. Archive Photo of the Day: Stuart Delman, Chestertown NY.
Root crops at the Glens Falls Farmers Market. Archive Photo of the Day: Stuart Delman, Chestertown NY.

NYS wants to make farmers' markets more accessible

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York state wants to make farmers' markets more accessible to low-income consumers.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the state will make $130,000 in grants available this year to support at least 13 traditional farmers' market and youth market grant projects.  Go to full article
High tunnels like these can help farmers extend the season
High tunnels like these can help farmers extend the season

Winter markets a challenge up North

The state agriculture department says New York has 75 winter farmers markets that run December through March. None of those, however, are in the North Country. According to Cornell Cooperative Extension's Bernadette Logozar, the markets in Lake Placid and Watertown run the latest, and they peter out in December.

Logozar is Extension's local foods specialist in the North Country. She told David Sommerstein the region's extra cold weather makes things like year-round greenhouses risky.  Go to full article
Brattleboro's winter market [credit: Nancy Cohen]
Brattleboro's winter market [credit: Nancy Cohen]

Winter farmers markets expand

Farmers markets have seen huge growth in the past three decades. They give consumers access to local food, sometimes at a lower price. And farmers can sell without a middleman getting a cut.

A growing number of markets now run through the entire winter. The state agriculture department says New York has 75 markets that run December through March. None of those, however, are in the North Country. Check out today's related story to find out why.

First, a visit to a winter farmers market, from WNPR's Nancy Cohen in southern Vermont.  Go to full article

Shoppers Challenge "Homegrown" Label

It's harvest time for some of the local crops. The fields are ripe with homegrown produce. Some supermarkets are advertising homegrown vegetables for sale. But some supermarkets define "homegrown" a lot differently than you might think. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Joyce Kryszak reports on some misleading marketing that's hurting local farmers.  Go to full article

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