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News stories tagged with "farming"

Diane Andrews prepares for the afternoon milking in the milk house.
Diane Andrews prepares for the afternoon milking in the milk house.

A Year on the Farm: Going Out Quietly?

As the year comes to an end, so does our series A Year on the Farm. David Sommerstein's been sending regular postcards from Bob Andrews 80-cow dairy near Gouverneur in St. Lawrence County. We've learned about calving and plowing and harvesting, round bales and square bales. But what REALLY makes dairy different from any other kind of farming are the daily milkings. That's where the series started, and that's where it'll end.  Go to full article

Report: immigrants moving to rural America

The story of immigrants flooding America's cities is almost as old as the United States itself. But a new report shows a shifting trend. While cities remain the main destination, a growing number of immigrants are settling in small, rural communities. They're drawn to jobs in agriculture, meatpacking, and the tourism and resort industries. Leif Jensen wrote the report for the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire. He told David Sommerstein that immigrants to small towns tend to poorer and less well educated than those who settle in cities. They also tend to be Mexican, married, and employed.  Go to full article

Preserving the classic Thanksgiving turkey

Deciding on the type of turkey for your big holiday feast isn't always easy. You can choose the usual supermarket bird, or you can get a kosher turkey, or one that's been fed only organic feed. You can also buy a heritage turkey - with little wilder history. Rebecca Williams found a farmer near her who's helping to keep these older turkey breeds from going extinct.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews, new grandfather, on his new feeding pad.
Bob Andrews, new grandfather, on his new feeding pad.

A Year on the Farm: life and death (and life)

Farming is, really, the story of the life cycle. Planting and harvesting. Calving and slaughtering. Barns are raised. Some eventually fall back to the earth. David Sommerstein's nearing completion of a year-long cycle on Bob Andrews' farm near Gouverneur. Today, life and death...and life again...on the farm.

BREAKING NEWS: Yesterday at 11:51am, Bob and Diane Andrews' daughter, Jessie, gave birth to Margot Diane Pritting in Syracuse - 7 pounds, 5 ounces. Both mother and child are healthy and happy. Bob and Diane hope to get away to see their first grandchild when they can find someone to milk the cows. A big congrats to the Andrews!  Go to full article

Small protest to hispanic laborers

There's been little public opposition in the North Country to the growing number of Hispanic workers on dairy farms. But earlier this month, a small group protested outside the St. Lawrence County Farm Bureau's "A Day at the Farm" event at Jon Greenwood's dairy in Canton. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article
Bob's more than six feet tall, so the corn really is high...
Bob's more than six feet tall, so the corn really is high...

A Year on the Farm: The sound of corn growing

This year, David Sommerstein's spending time each month on one dairy farm to learn more about what farmers do every day. The series is called A Year on the Farm. Our willing farmer is Bob Andrews in the town of Fowler near Gouverneur. Last episode, David learned all about hay. The other big crop for dairy farmers is corn, and it's Bob Andrews' favorite. So today's edition of A Year on the Farm is an ode to corn.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews
Bob Andrews

A Year on the Farm: Hay is for haylage

Everywhere you look this time of year, you see miles and miles of hay. Hay in round bales, square bales, wrapped in white plastic, lined in long strips across fields, piled in a big wagon hitched to the back of a tractor. This year, David Sommerstein's spending time on Bob Andrews' dairy near Gouverneur to learn the ins and outs of farming. Today's episode of A Year on the Farm is all about hay.  Go to full article
An antique tractor sits on the front lawn of the new museum in Madrid
An antique tractor sits on the front lawn of the new museum in Madrid

Farm museum finds new home

A 115-acre farm near the village of Madrid will be the new home for the St. Lawrence Power and Equipment Museum. The museum's members are devoted to the preservation of old engines, tractors, treshing machines and farm buildings. A ribbon-cutting ceremony Sunday marked the start of work on the new site. Todd Moe spoke with Leon and Carol Goolden, who sold the family farm to the group, and board member Roger Austin, who says the museum will focus on the history of farming in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties.  Go to full article

Keeping the cows cool

We were wondering how dairy farms cope with the heat. Martha Foley called Molly Ames, a farm business educator with the Cornell Cooperative Extension Service in Jefferson County. Martha wanted to know if she had any personal experience farming.  Go to full article

Amish Consider Future Of Cheese Plant

Amish dairy farmers in St. Lawrence County met yesterday to try to find a place to sell their milk. They'll reportedly seek an ownership share in Heritage Cheese House in Heuvelton. The cheese plant stopped taking milk from 95 Amish families Saturday. The company says low cheese prices have made the business unprofitable. The Watertown Daily Times reports this morning that the 71 Amish farmers who met yesterday were unanimous in their decision to form a trust to work with the plant. There's hope other buyers will also emerge in the effort to keep the plant open. David Sommerstein has more.  Go to full article

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