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News stories tagged with "farming"

Now is a good time to take stock of what you still need to do to get the best harvest from this gardening season. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nedrai/4859608633/">Nedra</a>, Creative Commons, Some rights reserved
Now is a good time to take stock of what you still need to do to get the best harvest from this gardening season. Photo: Nedra, Creative Commons, Some rights reserved

Looking ahead, and taking stock of the garden

By the calendar, and by the thermometer, we're entering the last weeks of summer. Gardeners can make some decisions about what vegetables are on the wane, and which ones need more encouragement. Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy has tips on squash and cucumbers, and the tomato-eggplant-pepper family in her weekly conversation with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
Clayton Distillery in the Thousand Islands is part of the locavore distillery trend -- it produces distilled products from locally grown grains and fruits. Photo courtesy <a href="http://claytondistillery.com/">Clayton Distillery</a>
Clayton Distillery in the Thousand Islands is part of the locavore distillery trend -- it produces distilled products from locally grown grains and fruits. Photo courtesy Clayton Distillery

Craft distilleries are the latest in the locavore trend

As people turn away from mass-produced products, demand is growing for locally produced food, wine and beer.

In upstate New York this trend is also reaching the field of craft distilleries, and the state is seeing a comeback of the small, artisan liquor operations of the pre-prohibition era.  Go to full article
Japeanese beetles making lace of a leaf. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/63879521@N00/4751305764">J. Michael Raby</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Japeanese beetles making lace of a leaf. Photo: J. Michael Raby, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Midsummer can bring on bug blues in the garden

We're turning the page from July to August this week. After variable weather conditions, including see-sawing temperatures and variable rainfall, a gardener might think he or she is in the homestretch. Here's hoping! But there's still time for troubles with damaging bugs to move in.

Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley she's battling Japanese beetles, which seem to be more and more common in the region.

That, in their weekly conversation, along with some tips on when to harvest onions.  Go to full article
Porcelain garlic.
Porcelain garlic.

Checkered weather makes for hard times in the garden

Wind, rain, no rain, high heat...the weather has been varied and extreme across the North Country. Gardeners are struggling with flattened corn, dried out soil, and fast-growing weeds.

Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy offers a pep talk and some advice in her weekly conversation with Martha Foley, along with a reminder: It's time to harvest the garlic!  Go to full article
Chicks at Renee Smith's farm, DeKalb Junction, NY. Photo: Julie Grant
Chicks at Renee Smith's farm, DeKalb Junction, NY. Photo: Julie Grant

Local chicken processing gets USDA cerification

The North Country local food movement just got a big boost. The ribbon was cut Thursday on a new, USDA-certified, mobile poultry processing unit.

The project is owned by a group called North Country Pastured - and full disclosure - NCPR general manager Ellen Rocco is part-owner.

The new unit provides poultry producers a way to have their birds processed locally, and certified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.  Go to full article
Migrant workers rally at the capitol in Montpelier this spring. Photo: Sarah Harris
Migrant workers rally at the capitol in Montpelier this spring. Photo: Sarah Harris

Migrant worker and activist allowed to stay in U.S.

Danilo Lopez will be allowed to stay in the country, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) says. Lopez, a Vermont migrant-worker-turned-activist from Mexico, advocated for a new law allowing people without legal status to get drivers' licenses. Lopez was scheduled to be deported on July 5.  Go to full article
Dairy farmer Mike Kiechle of Philadelphia, NY, spreads manure from his tractor. He's the kind of small farmer the new rules are trying to target, but he says he doubts he'll grow his herd bigger. Photo: David Sommerstein
Dairy farmer Mike Kiechle of Philadelphia, NY, spreads manure from his tractor. He's the kind of small farmer the new rules are trying to target, but he says he doubts he'll grow his herd bigger. Photo: David Sommerstein

Will the Greek yogurt boom help dairy farmers?

Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced New York will be one of four states in a test program to include Greek yogurt in school lunches.

State officials praised the news - as a new way to induce kids to eat their protein, and as a way to continue to fuel the Greek yogurt boom for New York dairy farmers.

New York has invested millions of dollars in tax breaks into new and expanding yogurt plants. Governor Andrew Cuomo eased environmental rules to encourage 200 cow dairy farms to become 300 cow dairy farms and make more milk.

Experts say New York farmers will have to boost milk production by 15%, or 2 billion pounds each year, to keep up with demand.

So does New York have a milk shortage? And are farmers stepping up it fill it?
David Sommerstein reports the answers lie in cream cheese, Old McDonald, and something called the Chobani Paradox.  Go to full article
Flooded field at Burlington Intervale last week. Photo: Sarah Harris
Flooded field at Burlington Intervale last week. Photo: Sarah Harris

Rainy weather hurts crops and markets

Warm temperatures and wetter-than-normal conditions so far this summer are starting to put a strain on farmers.

The weather pattern's also impacting farmers markets.  Go to full article
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York: pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York: pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail

Why both pro- and anti-frackers welcome Gasland sequel

Monday night brought the TV premiere of Gasland II, a sequel to the original anti-hydro fracking movie.
In New York, where Governor Cuomo's decision on fracking is still on hold, both opponents and supporters of fracking say the films have helped frame the debate.  Go to full article
Bee keeper Dick Crawford (R) shows his hives to North Country Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh)  Photo: Brian Mann
Bee keeper Dick Crawford (R) shows his hives to North Country Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh) Photo: Brian Mann

For North Country beekeepers, death and questions

We've been hearing a lot lately about honeybee mortality and big die-offs and fears about things like Monsanto's genetically modified corn.

A report issued last October by the US Department of Agriculture found that "overall losses" for commercial beekeepers in the U.S. continue to be high, and described hive collapse as a mystery.

Farm experts say the loss of honeybees could threaten the pollination needed for a wide range of crops, including the apple orchards that grow in the Champlain Valley.  Go to full article

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