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News stories tagged with "farming"

Semen Quality Harmed by Farm Chemicals?

A new study shows that fertile men in more rural areas have lower sperm counts and less vigorous sperm than men in urban centers. It's the first study that shows that semen quality differs significantly between regions of the United States. As the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Annie MacDowell reports, agricultural chemicals may be to blame.  Go to full article

Farming in the Age of Global Warming

For years, scientists have been studying what will happen to our environment in the age of global warming. A recently released report draws some conclusions about what may happen in the farm fields. The Great Lake Radio Consortium's Bill Cohen reports.  Go to full article

Grass-fed Beef Good for Business?

Most of the cattle raised in the Great Lakes region spend their lives in a feedlot, fattening up on corn and other grains. But there's a growing number of organic farmers looking at putting their cows in the pasture. They say grass-fed beef is a healthy alternative. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Brad Linder has more.
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Summer 2002: A Challenge for Farmers

Martha Foley talks with Pete Barney, agronomist with Cornell Cooperative Extension in Canton, about the challenges of farming in the North Country this summer.  Go to full article

Help For Dairy Farmers Gets Mixed Reviews

Details were announced yesterday on a new federal subsidy program for dairy farmers. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

Cabot Eyes McCadam

The makers of Cabot cheese in Vermont are looking into buying the North Country's oldest cheesemaker, McCadam of Heuvelton and Chateaugay. As David Sommerstein reports, the news is the latest indicator of a rapidly changing dairy industry.  Go to full article

Kraft Canton in Jeopardy


The future of the St. Lawrence County factory that makes award-winning Kraft cheddar cheese is uncertain. Kraft says it's evaluating the efficiency of its Canton plant along with others around the country. David Sommerstein has more.
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Dairy Farmers Revive Old Customs

If you drive out into the countryside these days, expecting pastoral scenes of placid cows grazing leisurely on grassy hillsides, you'll be at least 50 years too late. Traditional pastoral herding practices, based on the summertime abundance of self-renewing grasses, has mostly disappeared. It's been replaced by year-round production based on dried feeds grown from intensively worked soils. But some farms are resisting the trend. The Pleasant Ridge Farm in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, like a number of other farms around the Great Lakes region, is an example of a successful and quite modern, revival of pasture-based agriculture. You would also find an incredibly tasty cheese. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Ed Janus reports.  Go to full article

A Slow, Cold Start to the Growing Season

Below normal temperatures and late frost could stunt the growth of some North Country crops. And recent heavy rains are halting work in the fields. The relatively mild winter and summer-like temperatures in April did give the growing season a heads-up, but as Jody Tosti reports, the more a bud grows the more it's susceptible to damage.  Go to full article

Pesticide Residues Show Up On Organics

A recent report says if you eat organic produce, your exposure to
pesticide residues will be lower, but it doesn't mean your food is free from pesticides. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Rebecca Williams explains.  Go to full article

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