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News stories tagged with "fiber"

Roger Hastings shears Dolly Llama. Photo: Sarah Harris
Roger Hastings shears Dolly Llama. Photo: Sarah Harris

Dolly Llama, Daisy, and 14 alpacas get a haircut

Summer means shearing season. All across the North Country, sheep, alpacas, and llamas are getting serious haircuts and losing their winter coats. A couple weeks ago reporter Sarah Harris went to an alpaca shearing in Ray Brook.

It had special significance for her. Sarah has two llamas living in her backyard that desperately needed to be shorn. So she watched, she learned, and she later helped her llamas get a much-needed shave.  Go to full article
Ron Flannery connects a Dickinson Center camp. Photo: Sarah Harris
Ron Flannery connects a Dickinson Center camp. Photo: Sarah Harris

Local internet provider connects the North Country

The Internet is a big part of 21st century life - people use it get news, watch movies, apply for jobs, and pay bills. But the North Country lags behind the rest of New York state in connectivity. 20 percent of people in the region don't have fast, reliable internet connections. That's compared to just 5% of people state-wide.

SLIC, a local internet provider that grew out of Nicholville Telephone Company, is trying to change that.  Go to full article
Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael, love spending the winter months in their rustic home, filled with looms, near Harrisville.  Originally from Denmark, Lis uses bright colors to help offset overcast skies and the snowy landscape. Photo: Todd Moe
Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael, love spending the winter months in their rustic home, filled with looms, near Harrisville. Originally from Denmark, Lis uses bright colors to help offset overcast skies and the snowy landscape. Photo: Todd Moe

Living with looms and working with wool

March is the start of another busy season of exhibits, fairs and road trips for artisans across the region. Over the next few months, we'll bring you some of the voices of the many folks in the North Country who make a living in their own workshops, basements and spare rooms. It might sound charming - setting your own work hours - but the artisans we've talked to say full-time art is not an easy decision and a lot of hard work. Finding space, commissions, marketing, moral support, and reserving uninterrupted creative time are some of the challenges.

Today, a trip to the woods near Harrisville, in the northwestern Adirondacks, to visit a couple who gave up jobs in marketing and at the post office to devote their attention to all things fiber, from woven rugs to knitted sweaters. Lis Barsuglia-Madsen and her husband Michael moved from New Jersey to the North Country twenty years ago. The new environment offered a chance to focus on following a dream -- spending time together as artisans inspired by the mountains, deep woods and solitude.  Go to full article
This quilt is believed to be made by a discharged soldier while recovering from wounds received in the Civil War.
This quilt is believed to be made by a discharged soldier while recovering from wounds received in the Civil War.

Quilts by men at Shelburne Museum

Quilt making is traditionally associated with women, but a new exhibit at Shelburne Museum in Vermont focuses on quilts made by men. Quilts on display include some made by soldiers who were injured in the Civil War, and from boys who were ill in childhood and learned how to quilt from their mothers. The quilts in the exhibit include some from the 1860's and contemporary innovations.

Todd Moe talks with Shelburne's chief curator Jean Burks, and Joe Cunningham - aka Joe the Quilter - who'll give a lecture at the museum next week.  Go to full article
Shubel Clark's War of 1812 jacket at the Potsdam Museum.
Shubel Clark's War of 1812 jacket at the Potsdam Museum.

Heard Up North: An old coat is War of 1812 relic

The Potsdam Museum recently rediscovered an historic War of 1812 officer's uniform in its archives -- just in time for bicentennial commemorations. Museum officials say the dark blue and red wool uniform is in "very nice" condition for a 200-year old garment.

It's thought to have belonged to Shubel Clark, a soldier from Canton who was assigned to the New York Detached Militia in Ogdensburg. The heirloom was donated to the museum in 1953 by Clark's family.

Todd Moe stopped by for a closer look yesterday. The story behind the old coat is today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

Open Studio (full program)

Debut broadcast of NCPR's new monthly regional arts program. Todd Moe hosts. Live music with Piquant; an Adirondack arts activist takes lessons to Russia; hooked picture rugs that detail life along the St. Lawrence River; new music from flamenco guitarist Maria Zemantauksi; Vermont poet David Budbill on tour with jazz musicians Hamid Drake and William Parker, and much more.  Go to full article

For Women Who Knit Too Much

Stephanie Pearl-McPhee is the author of a book called At Knit's End, Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much. She also writes a funny web blog for people like her who are obsessed with knitting. Pearl-McPhee is a mother in her mid-thirties, a Canadian, who has found echoes of her OWN fixation in the hearts of knitters across both Canada and the US. She'll be at Kaleidescope Yarns in Essex Junction, VT tomorrow from 3 to 6. She took time out from her book tour to talk with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

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