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News stories tagged with "film"

The Palace Theater in Lake Placid, late on a Saturday night. Photos: Natasha Haverty
The Palace Theater in Lake Placid, late on a Saturday night. Photos: Natasha Haverty

Listen: Remembering silent film organist Jeff Barker

Jeff Barker wasn't well known in the North Country. But his music and his work as an instrument restorer brought back to life a part of the region's history.
Barker was a celebrated organ player from Manchester, England who specialized in accompanying silent movies.

For more than a decade, his performances were a big draw at the Palace Theater in Lake Placid. The silent films he accompanied were also a cornerstone of the Lake Placid Film Forum.

In 1998, Barker also led the team that restored the Palace's Robert Morton organ, which was first built in 1926. Brian Mann knew Barker for years, and learned last week that he'd passed away on New Year's Eve. He has this look back at Barker's life and his work in Lake Placid.  Go to full article
Film poster for "Captain Phillips" which has been nominated for six Academy Awards.
Film poster for "Captain Phillips" which has been nominated for six Academy Awards.

In Whallonsburg, real star of "Captain Phillips" talks modern piracy

It's Oscar season and this year two Academy Award nominees have connections here in our region. One is "12 Years A Slave", which tells the true story of a free black man, Solomon Northup. In the 1800s, Northup lived much of his life in the North Country before being abducted and sold into slavery in the South.

The other movie with connections to our region is "Captain Phillips," which tells the true tale of Captain Richard Phillips, a Vermont merchant mariner who survived a modern pirate attack off the coast of Somalia in 2009. Phillips visited the Adirondacks earlier this month for a screening of the film about his life at the Whallonsburg Grange Hall.  Go to full article
The Lyme Community Foundation is hosting a Silent Film Festival on February 22, 2014, 7 pm, in Chaumont Presbyterian Church, Chaumont, NY. Four films, including "The Goat," will be accompanied by North Country organist Jason Comet, using his originally compiled scores. Image: "The Goat," silent film poster. Artist: unknown.
The Lyme Community Foundation is hosting a Silent Film Festival on February 22, 2014, 7 pm, in Chaumont Presbyterian Church, Chaumont, NY. Four films, including "The Goat," will be accompanied by North Country organist Jason Comet, using his originally compiled scores. Image: "The Goat," silent film poster. Artist: unknown.

Watertown organist recreates the magic of silent films

A century ago, moviegoers flocked to cinemas to watch films without dialogue or sounds. The mood and sound effects were provided by a musician, usually at a pipe organ.

The Lyme Community Foundation is hosting a Silent Film Festival on Saturday night at 7, in Chaumont Presbyterian Church. Four films, including Buster Keaton's "The Goat," will be accompanied by Watertown organist Jason Comet, using originally compiled film scores.

Comet told Todd Moe that after the release of "The Jazz Singer" in 1927, "talkies" became more popular. But today, there's a renewed demand for silent film classics.  Go to full article
Kat Evans plays non-traditional student, and combat veteran, Erika Bird, in "Nontraditional". Still from film courtesy Clarkson University
Kat Evans plays non-traditional student, and combat veteran, Erika Bird, in "Nontraditional". Still from film courtesy Clarkson University

Struggles of female warrior in Potsdam-made feature film

Tonight at the Roxy Theater, a new full-length film with a mostly North Country cast makes its local premiere. "Nontraditional" was filmed almost entirely in Potsdam and on the Clarkson University campus.

It's the fictional story of a female combat veteran struggling to return to civilian life. The story is based on interviews directors Brian Hauser and Christina Xydias did with female veterans. It's also based on Hauser's personal experiences as an Army veteran.

Listen to an interview with writer/director Hauser and co-producer Xydias. Hauser told David Sommerstein the main character is 26 year-old Erika Bird. She was a military police officer in Afghanistan and Iraq. And now she's returning home to get a college degree.

The film has its local premiere tonight at 7:15 at the Roxy Theater in Potsdam.  Go to full article
The Palace Theatre in Lake Placid hosts the <i>Go Digital or Go Dark</i> event, Friday from 5-6:15 pm.  Photo:  ANCA
The Palace Theatre in Lake Placid hosts the Go Digital or Go Dark event, Friday from 5-6:15 pm. Photo: ANCA

Small theaters struggle in the digital age

The movie world is changing the way it makes films. Hollywood studios are going digital and later this year will no longer release films on film. Movie projectors are disappearing during this digital revolution. For most small theaters, the price to upgrade to digital equipment can be staggering, and the change is putting many in a very difficult financial situation -- upgrade costs are as high as $100,000.

The Adirondack Film Society and Adirondack North Country Association are kicking off a campaign Friday night at the Palace Theatre in Lake Placid to raise money to help local theaters complete the digital upgrades needed to continue to operate. Todd Moe has more on the Go Digital or Go Dark world premiere.  Go to full article
The crowd at a Wild & Scenic Film Festival event in California. Photo: Wild & Scenic Film Fest
The crowd at a Wild & Scenic Film Festival event in California. Photo: Wild & Scenic Film Fest

Preview: Wild & Scenic Film Festival

The new director's cut of the local Adirondack film, Small Farm Rising, will be shown at the Wild & Scenic Film Festival in Lake Placid this weekend. The 10th annual festival, hosted by the Placid Lake Foundation, will be held at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts on Friday and Saturday. Todd Moe talks with Placid Lake Foundation Executive Director Christian Weber, who says the film series is the largest environmental film festival in North America.  Go to full article
View of Lake Placid from the summit of Little Whiteface Mountain.  For more information about <i>A Place to Dream</i>, call 518-523-1312.  (photo: Giggy)
View of Lake Placid from the summit of Little Whiteface Mountain. For more information about A Place to Dream, call 518-523-1312. (photo: Giggy)

Preview: "A Place to Dream" in Lake Placid

NCPR is media sponsor for Adirondacks: A Place to Dream, a three-day event in Lake Placid this weekend. Arts and cultural organizations from throughout the region will gather to explore the power of place that, for more than 150 years, has drawn some of the world's greatest artists, photographers, musicians, filmmakers and writers to the mountains. The multi-media weekend will include some of the most important voices in the Adirondack arts and culture community.

Todd Moe talks with Gary Smith, one of the co-organizers of the event, who says the free series of lectures and conversations will cover music, art, storytelling, writing, films and photography.  Go to full article

Keeping a movie theater quaint, and open

A South Glens Falls man opened a small movie theater earlier this summer and says he's not worried about the film industry's decision to switch distributing first run features from film to digital. Jerry Aratare says his single-screen Cinematheque shows foreign and first-run movies, though usually a couple of weeks later than the larger movie theaters.

The 82-year-old Aratare got his first movie theater job as a projectionist in 1951 in Vermont. He's opened about a dozen small theaters in the region over the years. He told Todd Moe that his newest theater has 66 seats, a decades-old projector he's dubbed "the old workhorse", and a "hometown" atmosphere.  Go to full article

Movie makers, film buffs gather in Lake Placid

The 12th annual Lake Placid Film Festival opens Wednesday, with new stars, new movies and a panel discussion on the future of small town theaters. This year's festival will feature screenings of films from local, national and International filmmakers, special guests and events such as the North Country Shorts and the return of the 24 hour student film-making competition, "Sleepless in Lake Placid."

Todd Moe spoke with Tim Brearton, the festival's project specialist. He's helped out since the inaugural forum in 2000. He calls it an event that brings people together, supports local artists and allows film students from area colleges to learn about the rigors of the film industry.  Go to full article
Furs traveled from the north via sled and bateau. Photos courtesy of the Hudson's Bay Company Archives
Furs traveled from the north via sled and bateau. Photos courtesy of the Hudson's Bay Company Archives

1919 film: "Treasures of the Far Fur Country"

In 1919, two intrepid cameramen left New York City to trek across the Canadian North. Traveling by foot, canoe, dog sled and icebreaker they filmed scenes from Hudson's Bay Company communities for that sponsor's upcoming 250th anniversary.

The finished two-hour movie was seen in Canada the following year. But once "talkies" took hold, interest in silent film faded. The original footage ended up tucked away in England, largely forgotten.

A collaborative project has been working to recover the film's source material for Canadians and the world. Some of the best segments will be shown April 3rd in a screening booked at the Canadian Museum of Civilization.

To learn more, Lucy Martin reached filmmaker and event organizer Kevin Nikkel in Winnipeg.  Go to full article

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