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News stories tagged with "film"

New play explores winter heating costs

A new tragicomedy that examines winter heating bills and personal safety gets a staged reading in Watertown on Saturday. Todd Moe talks with Watertown playwright Craig Thornton about The High Cost of Heating.  Go to full article

Film explores history, ideals of Lake Placid Winter Olympics

Lake Placid's Olympic heritage goes deep -- back to 1932, and through the "Miracle on Ice" 1980 games, to this month's games in Vancouver, Canada. The story of how Lake Placid developed as a winter sports resort and hosted two Olympic Winter Games is told in the documentary Small Town, Big Dreams. The film is being shown nationwide on public television this month as part of the 30th anniversary of the winter games in Lake Placid. It includes rare film footage and audio recordings from museums and private collections. Todd Moe talks with Adirondack-area filmmaker Scott Carroll about some of the people behind the '32 and '80 Winter Olympics, and whether the region could host the winter games again.  Go to full article

Preview: Lake Placid Film Forum

NCPR is media sponsor for this week's Lake Placid Film Forum. It runs from Thursday to Sunday and features film screenings, conversations with directors and authors, and a filmmaking competition. Events will be held at the Palace Theatre, Whiteface Lodge and the Lake Placid Center for the Arts. Todd Moe spoke with writer and filmmaker Barry Snyder. He teaches at Burlington College and is organizing the third annual "Sleepless in Lake Placid," the 24-hour filmmaking competition.  Go to full article

Film set at Akwesasne collects two nominations

(TEXT ONLY) Frozen River, a film set at the Akwesasne Mohawk Reservation on the border in northern New York has earned Oscar nominations for its screenwriter and one of its lead actresses. Frozen River tells the story of two women who are driven by poverty and circumstances to smuggle illegal immigrants across the US-Canada border.

Courtney Hunt is nominated for an Academy Award for best original screenplay. She also directed the movie. She told North Country Public Radio she knows the North Country because her husband is from Malone. She says it was women smugglers who really attracted her to the subject matter of Frozen River. She now lives in Chatham in Columbia County.

Melissa Leo, of New York's Ulster County, was nominated for best actress. She plays the single mother who finds herself destitute at Christmas and teams up with a Mohawk woman to bring a Pakistani woman and her baby across the border. Oscar winners will be announced during the 81st Academy Awards presentation Feb. 22. Frozen River also won the Grand Jury Award at this year's Sundance Film Festival.  Go to full article

Preview: film festival in Potsdam

The North Country Film Society and the Roxy Theater host the annual North Country Film Festival this weekend. The event opens Friday night at 8. Steve Madeja, one of the festival's organizers, told Todd Moe that it's a weekend of classic films and independent features.  Go to full article

Frozen River: St. Lawrence smuggling thriller early hit

A film about smuggling illegal immigrants across the frozen St. Lawrence River is drawing rave reviews in its first run of screenings. Frozen River tells the story of two women, one a Mohawk from Akwesasne, who are driven by poverty and dire circumstances to smuggle a Pakistani woman and her baby across the US-Canada border. David Edelstein, who writes reviews for NPR's Fresh Air, calls the film "gripping stuff." Kenneth Turan said on Morning Edition, "Frozen River will restore your faith in American independent film." The movie won the Grand Jury Award at this year's Sundance Film Festival. David Sommerstein caught up with Courtney Hunt by phone earlier this week. She says she knows the North Country because her husband is from Malone. She says it was women smugglers who really attracted her to the subject matter of Frozen River.  Go to full article
Director Reaghan Tarbell's grandmother (left) and great-grandmother in Brooklyn, c. 1940. Photo courtesy of Ida Meloche Diabo.
Director Reaghan Tarbell's grandmother (left) and great-grandmother in Brooklyn, c. 1940. Photo courtesy of Ida Meloche Diabo.

Film: A Mohawk neighborhood in Brooklyn

The First People's Festival runs this week through Sunday in Montreal. It showcases the best in art and culture from America's indigenous people. Showing tonight is a new documentary about a neighborhood in Brooklyn that was the epicenter of a community of Mohawk ironworkers in the 1940s and '50s. "Little Caughnawaga: To Brooklyn and Back" tells the story of that neighborhood through the eyes of the ironworkers' wives, and through their descendant, Reaghan Tarbell. Tarbell directed the film. She spoke with David Sommerstein.  Go to full article

Naturalist Ed Kanze says "The Adirondacks" will show Americans a complex portrait

Naturalist and writer Ed Kanze, who lives in Bloomingdale north of Saranac Lake, partnered on the Adirondacks documentary. His nature essays frame each of the four chapters of the film. Kanze says he hopes Americans will grasp some of the complexities of life inside the Blue Line.  Go to full article

Banned Indonesian film shows in Potsdam

A cutting-edge Dutch/Indonesian filmmaker will show and speak about one of his films Monday night in Potsdam. It's a part of the Cinema 10 film series. Leonard Retel Helmrich's documentary "Promised Paradise" has been banned in Indonesia. Helmrich is known for inventing a special technique for filming his documentaries, called "single shot cinema." "Promised Paradise" traces the story of a puppeteer who tries to arrange an interview with the perpetrators of the 2002 terrorist bombing at a nightclub in Bali. Helmrich spoke with David Sommerstein. "Promised Paradise" shows at 7:15 pm Monday night at the Roxy Theater in Potsdam.  Go to full article
A scene from <i>Out at the Wedding</i>
A scene from Out at the Wedding

Preview: Out at the Movies Festival opens tonight

The sixth annual Out at the Movies Film Festival opens tonight in Canton and Potsdam. It includes a diverse collection of documentary, dramatic and comedy films that explore issues in the gay and lesbian community. Todd Moe talks with director Lee Friedlander about her film Out at the Wedding.  Go to full article

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