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News stories tagged with "finch-lands"

DEC Commissioner Joe Martens hauls a canoe over one of the carry trails between the Essex Chain Lakes.  Photo:  Brian Mann
DEC Commissioner Joe Martens hauls a canoe over one of the carry trails between the Essex Chain Lakes. Photo: Brian Mann

New to explore in the Adirondacks: the Essex Chain Lakes

This is the final week for public comment on the new management plan for the Essex Chain Lakes in the central Adirondacks.

The 11,000-acre chunk of wild forest and lakes near the town of Newcomb is part of the massive Finch Pruyn conservation deal that has expanded the Park's public land.

State officials are hoping the Essex Chain will offer a popular new alternative for paddlers and hikers and anglers, drawing more visitors to a part of the Park that often sees little traffic.

Our Adirondack bureau chief Brian Mann made the trip last week and has our story.  Go to full article
Gov. Andrew Cuomo paddling on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County. NCPR file photo: Brian Mann
Gov. Andrew Cuomo paddling on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County. NCPR file photo: Brian Mann

Will the Finch land deal really boost the Adk economy?

Two years ago, when Gov. Andrew Cuomo revived the massive Finch, Pruyn land deal, first engineered by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy in 2007, he shifted the terms of a long-running debate over big land conservation projects in the park.

Funding for open space conservation had been under attack in Albany for years, including a moratorium on new spending. Even many Democrats were questioning the value to taxpayers of protecting more "forever wild" land in the park.

The governor turned that debate on its head, arguing that vast tracts of new public lands would be a boon to the state's tourism economy, rather than a costly burden, and would give struggling Adirondack towns a long-needed boost.  Go to full article
APA Deputy Director for Planning Jim Connolly gave much of the presentation at Thursday's meeting in Ray Brook. Photo: Brian Mann
APA Deputy Director for Planning Jim Connolly gave much of the presentation at Thursday's meeting in Ray Brook. Photo: Brian Mann

APA redraws Adirondack Map

This week, Adirondack Park Agency commissioners are meeting in an extraordinary two-day session that focuses almost entirely on a single question: How should New York state manage tens of thousands of the former Finch Pruyn timberlands now being added to the "forever wild" forest preserve?

Their answer to that question -- which could come as early as next month -- will literally redraw the Adirondack map, redefining public recreation over a vast area of the North Country.  Go to full article

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