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News stories tagged with "finch-pruyn"

Governor Andrew Cuomo made a surprise visit to the Adirondacks this week to talk about the Finch Pruyn deal.
Governor Andrew Cuomo made a surprise visit to the Adirondacks this week to talk about the Finch Pruyn deal.

Governor Cuomo intervenes in Finch land process

Governor Andrew Cuomo made a surprise visit to the Adirondacks yesterday, meeting with the Adirondack Nature Conservancy at Follensby Pond near Tupper Lake and then talking with local government leaders at Gore Mountain near North Creek.

The topic on the table was the Finch Pruyn Land deal. The Adirondack Park Agency is currently in the process of classifying tens of thousands of acres of new lands that are being added to the protected forest preserve.

Brian Mann joins me now in the studio to talk about the governor's visit. Brian, why did the governor turn up suddenly like this?  Go to full article
The Gooley Club is one of the traditional camps that will be displaced by the Finch Pruyn conservation deal. Photo source:  Youtube
The Gooley Club is one of the traditional camps that will be displaced by the Finch Pruyn conservation deal. Photo source: Youtube

Hunting clubs face big change in Finch Pruyn deal

Last week, the Adirondack Park Agency took up final deliberations on the future of the former Finch Pruyn timberland. The state is gradually adding more than 65,000 acres to the state forest preserve, as part of a conservation effort launched by the Adirondack Nature Conserve.

Most of the process has been remarkably free of controversy. But one flashpoint has been the fate of roughly 20 traditional hunting clubs that leased land from Finch Pruyn for decades.  Go to full article
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann

Public comment period ending for new Adk Park lands

This is the final week for the public to offer input and opinions about how to manage tens of thousands of acres of new public lands in the Adirondack Park.

The Adirondack Park Agency held hearings across the state to gather feedback on seven different proposals for how lands in Indian Lake and Minerva should be classified.

The hearings have wrapped up, but people still have until the end of the day on Friday to send written comments.  Go to full article
Ann Melious, Hamilton County's economic development and tourism director argued for more of the Finch lands to be classified as wild forest, allowing more kinds of recreation.  (Photo: Mark Kurtz)
Ann Melious, Hamilton County's economic development and tourism director argued for more of the Finch lands to be classified as wild forest, allowing more kinds of recreation. (Photo: Mark Kurtz)

Hearings underway for Park's new Finch Pruyn lands

This weekend, the state will open up portions of two recently-acquired former Finch, Pruyn and Co. timberlands in the central Adirondacks. That will mean more places to go in the Park for paddling, hiking and fishing. The access is temporary as the Adirondack Park Agency works to come up with a classification plan for the lands.

That process formally got under way this week when the APA hosted the first of eight public hearings scheduled around the state. Environmentalists are pushing for the new lands to be protected as wilderness, while sportsmen and local government officials want to see more opportunities for public access to the lands.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy via <em>Adirondack Daily Enterprise</em>
The Essex Chain of Lakes. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy via Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Essex Lakes could be opened to limited motorized access

New York's Department of Environmental Conservation has proposed opening up large portions of the 69,000 acres of former Finch, Pruyn and Co. timberlands the state is acquiring from The Nature Conservancy for public recreation.

Among other things, DEC's classification plan would allow motor vehicle and limited floatplane access to the Essex Chain of Lakes tract, which would become a new canoe area.

The plan is drawing praise from local government leaders who've fought for access to the former Finch lands, and criticism from environmentalists who want more the property protected as wilderness.  Go to full article
Governor Andrew Cuomo paddles on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County, one of the mountain lakes that will be opened to public access. Photo: Brian Mann
Governor Andrew Cuomo paddles on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County, one of the mountain lakes that will be opened to public access. Photo: Brian Mann

Governor promotes historic land deal in Adirondacks

Governor Andrew Cuomo traveled to the Adirondacks Sunday, bringing with him most of his executive cabinet and dozens of downstate reporters.

He made the trip to promote a big new $50 million land purchase that will add tens of thousands of acres to the Park's forest preserve.  Go to full article
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo:  Dan Snyder)
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo: Dan Snyder)

Nature Conservancy loggers accused of damaging Adirondack trout stream

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy has emerged in recent years as one of the largest owners of timberland in the North Country.

The green group uses certified logging methods designed to protect rivers and other sensitive ecosystems.

But a landowner in Essex County is accusing the Conservancy's tree-cutters of damaging a certified trout stream.

As Brian Mann reports, state officials have opened an investigation.  Go to full article
You know, we’re a willing partner and we remain a willing partner in the [Finch] project

Local government leaders divided over Finch conservation deal

In his budget unveiled earlier this month, Governor Andrew Cuomo maintained the state's Environmental Protection Fund at more than $130 million. Green groups praised the decision and say they hope some of the money will be used this year to expand the Adirondack forest preserve.

The Nature Conservancy wants to sell tens of thousands of acres to the state, lands that were once part of the Finch timber property. Now one of the most prominent local government groups in the Park is trying to rally opposition to the plan.

The Adirondack Local Government Review Board passed a strongly-worded resolution last month. The resolution urges the Governor to cancel additional land purchases in the Park until the state's fiscal crisis is over. But the Review Board's campaign represents a break with the stance taken by dozens of local communities in the Park, which have supported the project for years.

In the first of a two-part special series, Brian Mann reports that some town leaders say they still want the Finch conservation project to go forward.  Go to full article
OK Slip Falls is one of the areas that the Nature Conservancy hopes to protect with the help of NY State.  (Source:  TNC, Carl Heilman photo)
OK Slip Falls is one of the areas that the Nature Conservancy hopes to protect with the help of NY State. (Source: TNC, Carl Heilman photo)

NY budget crisis: "Old assumptions" about the Adirondack Park "will have to be reexamined"

The Adirondack Park Agency was created in 1971. In the decades since, a debate has raged over how the Park should be managed.

Specific issues change from year to year. But the basic battle lines over conservation, property rights, and economic development have long seemed carved in stone.

But now some observers say the budget crisis in Albany is changing all that, throwing into doubt some of the core ideas about the Park and its future. Brian Mann has our special report.  Go to full article
Joe Martens, OSI (Source:  APA
Joe Martens, OSI (Source: APA

OSI's Joe Martens: "We've got to start figuring out the (Adirondack Park) differently"

The Open Space Institute has helped to engineer some of the most important land conservation deals in the Adirondack Park over the last decade.

OSI financed the Tahawus purchase, which protected parts of the southern High Peaks. The group also helped fund the massive Finch, Pruyn deal worth more than $110 million.

But OSI executive director Joe Martens, who also heads the Olympic Regional Development Authority board, says the fiscal crisis in Albany is changing the rules for how the Park should be managed. Martens spoke in depth with NCPR's Adirondack bureau chief, Brian Mann.  Go to full article

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