Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "finch"

DEC planner Chris Alberga points to a map of the Essex Chain Lakes.  The Conservation Department says it will revise its proposed plan and release a new draft this fall for public comment.  Photo:  Brian Mann
DEC planner Chris Alberga points to a map of the Essex Chain Lakes. The Conservation Department says it will revise its proposed plan and release a new draft this fall for public comment. Photo: Brian Mann

Snowmobile muddle forces rewrite of Essex Chain Lakes plan

State officials are going back to the drawing board as they develop a plan for public use of the Essex Chain Lakes near Newcomb.

The 11,000-acre complex of lakes, logging roads and rivers in the central Adirondacks is part of the massive Finch Conservation deal engineered by the Nature Conservancy.

The Conservation Department had hoped to have a plan for public recreation in place by the end of this year.

But DEC planners have run into a major complication over a proposal for using snowmobiles in the area, a plan that would include a bridge over the scenic Cedar River.  Go to full article
Governor Andrew Cuomo, who visited Saranac Lake on Sunday, played a personal role in crafting the Finch wilderness deal. Photo:  Mark Kurtz
Governor Andrew Cuomo, who visited Saranac Lake on Sunday, played a personal role in crafting the Finch wilderness deal. Photo: Mark Kurtz

How Cuomo shaped new Adirondack wilderness

Later this month, Governor Andrew Cuomo is expected to sign off on a vast new wilderness and primitive area in the Adirondacks.

The classification deal for the former Finch lands was formally approved on Friday by the Adirondack Park Agency. But many of its details were crafted by the governor himself and by his staff in Albany.

Cuomo has taken an active role in the Finch conservation deal for more than a year, often pushing state officials, environmentalists and local government leaders to reach a compromise.  Go to full article
Governor Andrew Cuomo paddles a stretch of the Indian River, just upstream from the confluence with the Hudson River. Photo: NYS Governor's office
Governor Andrew Cuomo paddles a stretch of the Indian River, just upstream from the confluence with the Hudson River. Photo: NYS Governor's office

Cuomo says he'll sign Adirondack wilderness plan

The Adirondack Park Agency voted Friday to create a vast new 24,000-acre wilderness and primitive area along a remote stretch of the upper Hudson River.

The land, most of which lies in Hamilton County, had been owned by the Finch Pruyn logging and paper company for more than a century.

This decision by the Adirondack Park Agency commission sets aside a sprawling area of wild rivers, pristine lakes, and forests where most human development will be banned forever.  Go to full article
OK Slip Falls, considered one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy
OK Slip Falls, considered one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy

Historic Finch Adirondack vote expected this morning

Park Agency commissioners are expected to vote later today on creation of a vast new wilderness area in the central Adirondacks. The APA is in the final steps of deciding the fate of the former Finch timber lands.  Go to full article
The confluence of the Hudson River, at right, and the Cedar River, bottom, is on the 18,300-acre Essex Chain of Lakes tract in the towns of Minerva and Newcomb. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy of the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy
The confluence of the Hudson River, at right, and the Cedar River, bottom, is on the 18,300-acre Essex Chain of Lakes tract in the towns of Minerva and Newcomb. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy of the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy

Historic Finch lands decision near in Adirondacks

The Adirondack Park Agency has begun final deliberations into the future of the Finch Pruyn timberlands.

Roughly 40.000 acres in the central Adirondacks are slated to be classified tomorrow, with state officials pushing for creation of a big new wilderness area along the upper Hudson River. Also in the works is a new motor-free paddling area on the Essex Chain of Lakes.

At the start of yesterday's session, APA executive director Terry Martino called the conservation effort "historic." She praised the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, which engineered the massive deal, first unveiled in 2007.

Some aspects of the Finch classification plan remain controversial, including a plan to build a snowmobile bridge over the wild Cedar River. But the big story this week may be how amicable this process has been, with far less drama and bitterness than in previous years.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy
The Essex Chain of Lakes. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy

APA unveils Finch conservation plan for Adks

The Adirondack Park Agency plans to vote this week on land classification for thousands of acres of former Finch Pruyn timber land. Details of the proposal were unveiled on Friday.

The APA will hold a historic three-day meeting beginning on Wednesday and expects to make a decision by the end of the week.  Go to full article
Daniel Wilt, newly appointed APA commissioner.  Photo: Adirondack Park Agency
Daniel Wilt, newly appointed APA commissioner. Photo: Adirondack Park Agency

Finch lands top APA agenda

The Adirondack Park Agency gathers today in Ray Brook for a two-day meeting that will focus on the new Finch Pruyn lands.

Commissioners will consider alternate plans for managing the vast new public lands purchased as part of a deal engineered by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.  Go to full article
Brian Mann interviews Mike Carr, head of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.  His group is devoting $500,000 to helping spark new economic projects in the Park near the former Finch Pruyn timberlands (NCPR file photo)
Brian Mann interviews Mike Carr, head of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy. His group is devoting $500,000 to helping spark new economic projects in the Park near the former Finch Pruyn timberlands (NCPR file photo)

Adirondack Nature Conservancy offers $500,000 to boost jobs

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy says it will provide $500,000 in grant funds to help businesses and communities developing new projects around the former Finch Pruyn timberlands.

Tens of thousands of acres of land in Indian Lake, Minerva, and Newcomb are being added to the state forest preserve. Governor Andrew Cuomo has argued that the new lands will help boost the Park's tourism economy.

The Conservancy's Mike Carr says this grant fund is designed to help make that happen.  Go to full article
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann

Public comment period ending for new Adk Park lands

This is the final week for the public to offer input and opinions about how to manage tens of thousands of acres of new public lands in the Adirondack Park.

The Adirondack Park Agency held hearings across the state to gather feedback on seven different proposals for how lands in Indian Lake and Minerva should be classified.

The hearings have wrapped up, but people still have until the end of the day on Friday to send written comments.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy
The Essex Chain of Lakes. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy

In Adks debate resumes over fate of Finch lands

State officials announced yesterday that they'll begin public hearings in June to decide how the former Finch Pruyn timberlands will be managed, now that they've been added to the Adirondack forest preserve.

The classification process will sort out what kinds of recreation and access will be allowed over a wide swath of the upper Hudson River that's being opened to the public for the first time in 150 years.

Environmentalists and local government leaders have very different visions.  Go to full article

1-10 of 28  next 10 »  last »