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News stories tagged with "finch"

Brian Mann interviews Mike Carr, head of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.  His group is devoting $500,000 to helping spark new economic projects in the Park near the former Finch Pruyn timberlands (NCPR file photo)
Brian Mann interviews Mike Carr, head of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy. His group is devoting $500,000 to helping spark new economic projects in the Park near the former Finch Pruyn timberlands (NCPR file photo)

Adirondack Nature Conservancy offers $500,000 to boost jobs

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy says it will provide $500,000 in grant funds to help businesses and communities developing new projects around the former Finch Pruyn timberlands.

Tens of thousands of acres of land in Indian Lake, Minerva, and Newcomb are being added to the state forest preserve. Governor Andrew Cuomo has argued that the new lands will help boost the Park's tourism economy.

The Conservancy's Mike Carr says this grant fund is designed to help make that happen.  Go to full article
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann

Public comment period ending for new Adk Park lands

This is the final week for the public to offer input and opinions about how to manage tens of thousands of acres of new public lands in the Adirondack Park.

The Adirondack Park Agency held hearings across the state to gather feedback on seven different proposals for how lands in Indian Lake and Minerva should be classified.

The hearings have wrapped up, but people still have until the end of the day on Friday to send written comments.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy
The Essex Chain of Lakes. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy

In Adks debate resumes over fate of Finch lands

State officials announced yesterday that they'll begin public hearings in June to decide how the former Finch Pruyn timberlands will be managed, now that they've been added to the Adirondack forest preserve.

The classification process will sort out what kinds of recreation and access will be allowed over a wide swath of the upper Hudson River that's being opened to the public for the first time in 150 years.

Environmentalists and local government leaders have very different visions.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy

Green groups want big new wilderness in Adirondacks

Governor Andrew Cuomo has committed New York state to buying nearly 70,000 acres of land that will be added to the Adirondack forest preserve over the next five years.

It's one of the largest conservation projects in the Park's history. But buying the land is only the first step in figuring out how it should be managed in the years ahead.

Town and county leaders hope the land around Newcomb and North Hudson will become a major tourist attraction, with new opportunities to paddle stretches of the Hudson River and fish wild trout-filled lakes.

But a growing number of environmental groups in the park say much of the land should be designated as wilderness, a classification that could sharply limit public access.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)

NY to shape public use of new Adirondack park land

State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year.

Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year. Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. Supporters say these lands will open popular new areas for hiking, paddling, hunting and fishing.

The process is now underway to determine the kind of rules and guidelines that will shape public access, and state officials say they hope to avoid the kind of clashes that have marked past land classification efforts.  Go to full article
Governor Andrew Cuomo (R) with Bill Ulfelder, Executive Director of the Nature Conservancy in New York, signing the Finch Pruyn deal Sunday in Lake Placid. Photo:  Brian Mann
Governor Andrew Cuomo (R) with Bill Ulfelder, Executive Director of the Nature Conservancy in New York, signing the Finch Pruyn deal Sunday in Lake Placid. Photo: Brian Mann

Local government review board blasts $47 million Cuomo land deal as "irresponsible"

A state funded watchdog group is blasting Governor Cuomo for his decision to purchase tens of thousands of acres of Adirondack land, to be added to the Park's forest preserve. The $47-milllion deal was unveiled on Sunday.

A group called the Adirondack Park Local Government Review board is calling the decision irresponsible. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Mays Pond, an inholding in the Pigeon Lake Wilderness, will likely sell to a private landowner (Photo: LandVest)
Mays Pond, an inholding in the Pigeon Lake Wilderness, will likely sell to a private landowner (Photo: LandVest)

Small Adirondack land deals may slip through NY's fingers

This week, the Cuomo administration paid out roughly $1.5 million to land trusts across the state. The money will mostly go to help with administration costs and to fund internships.

In the Adirondacks, much of the land conservation debate over the last few years has focused on historic large-scale deals orchestrated by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.

The Finch Pruyn and F ollensby projects could lead to the expansion of the Park's forest preserve by tens of thousands of acres.

But while those projects draw the spotlight, and the controversy, green groups say they're worried that smaller but important parcels of land are going unprotected. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo:  Dan Snyder)
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo: Dan Snyder)

Nature Conservancy loggers accused of damaging Adirondack trout stream

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy has emerged in recent years as one of the largest owners of timberland in the North Country.

The green group uses certified logging methods designed to protect rivers and other sensitive ecosystems.

But a landowner in Essex County is accusing the Conservancy's tree-cutters of damaging a certified trout stream.

As Brian Mann reports, state officials have opened an investigation.  Go to full article
APA chairman Curt Stiles says LGRB's resolution okay (File photo)
APA chairman Curt Stiles says LGRB's resolution okay (File photo)

APA chairman says Review Board can weigh in on land purchases

A prominent pro-environment group has been pushing the Adirondack Park Local Government Review Board to stop commenting on the issue of state land-purchases in the Park.

The Adirondack Council argues that the state-funded Review Board doesn't have a mandate to weigh in on the issue.

But APA chairman Curt Stiles says Review Board is defending the Review Board's decision to issue a resolution opposing the Finch Pruyn and Follensby land deals.

Chris Morris has details.  Go to full article
All these towns were effectively trying to negotiate the best deal they could, knowing that they had in effect a gun to their head...

Some Adirondack towns say they were pressured to support Finch conservation deal

Yesterday, NCPR reported that local governments in the Adirondack Park are deeply divided over the future of the Finch conservation project.

That land deal would add roughly 60,000 acres to the "forever wild" forest preserve.

One reason that the project is still so controversial, four years after it was unveiled, is that many community leaders feel that they were strong-armed into accepting it.

Other town supervisors say they felt the negotiations were fair and productive.

In part two of his special report, Brian Mann looks at the politics and the backroom talks that shaped the Finch deal.  Go to full article

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