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News stories tagged with "fish"

The Mangrove rivulus, a species of Caribbean killifish, can survive out of water for months, hiding inside damp mangrove logs. Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mangrove_rivulus.jpg">USGS</a>
The Mangrove rivulus, a species of Caribbean killifish, can survive out of water for months, hiding inside damp mangrove logs. Photo: USGS

What can fish do when the water goes away?

From walking catfish, to snakeheads, to species of killifish, some fish actually survive outside of water for a surprising length of time.

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss the old cliche "like a fish out of water," and about the strategies some fish use to do just fine out there in the air.  Go to full article
Yellow perch. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_perch#mediaviewer/File:YellowPerch.jpg">Eugene Zelenko</a>, released to public domain
Yellow perch. Photo: Eugene Zelenko, released to public domain

Yellow perch, Adirondack natives after all

For decades, Adirondack resource managers have blamed the yellow perch for the decline of heritage trout strains, believing that perch were introduced to Adirondack waters in recent times and have been displacing the native strains from their historic habitat.

But lake sediment core samples taken by Curt Stager and his students at Paul Smiths College yield DNA evidence showing that trout have been co-existing with perch for at least 2,000 years there. While perch are aggressive competitors and native trout are in decline, the reason for the change in balance likely lies in other factors yet to be determined.  Go to full article
Lamprey control aims at eradicating them in the larva stage (in hand) before they grow into toothy adults (inset) Photo: Sarah Harris
Lamprey control aims at eradicating them in the larva stage (in hand) before they grow into toothy adults (inset) Photo: Sarah Harris

Natural Selections: Lampreys

Lampreys - are they fish or eel? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about this jawless fish with a head full of teeth and a sucking mouth.  Go to full article
Ray with one of his favorite lures made by the C.W. Lane Manufacturing Company in Madrid, NY. Photo: Todd Moe
Ray with one of his favorite lures made by the C.W. Lane Manufacturing Company in Madrid, NY. Photo: Todd Moe

In Canton, North Country-made antique fishing lures on display

Just in time for fishing season, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York is celebrating the art of antique hand-made fishing lures. In the 19th and early 20th century, anglers were able to purchase lures manufactured in small shops in communities from Old Forge to Lake Clear to Clayton.

Norwood collector Ray Bartholomew grew up fishing in Jefferson County and has been collecting old-time fishing tackle for more than 30 years. Some of his favorites will be on display at TAUNY in Canton starting this Saturday. Todd Moe spoke with Bartholomew about his passion for antique fishing equipment and research into some of the North Country's finest lure artisans.  Go to full article
One of the approximately 11,000 fish released. Photo: Sarah Harris.
One of the approximately 11,000 fish released. Photo: Sarah Harris.

Stocking sturgeon in the St. Lawrence

The St. Lawrence River has more sturgeon than it did yesterday. About 11,000 baby sturgeon were released into the St. Lawrence and its tributaries.

State environmental officials hope to restore the sturgeon population in the region.  Go to full article
Jose Fernandez holds a small salmon he caught in a creek in Pulaski. He's been fishing in the area for 30 years. Photo: Joanna Richards
Jose Fernandez holds a small salmon he caught in a creek in Pulaski. He's been fishing in the area for 30 years. Photo: Joanna Richards

Salmon, and fishermen, school in Pulaski

Each fall, thousands of salmon swim upstream along the Salmon River and nearby creeks, trying to return to the state's Salmon River Fish Hatchery in Altmar, where they were born.

The fish head home to spawn. But they face a gauntlet of fisherman in the waterways around Pulaski, drawn by the fishes' large sizes and numbers.

In this Heard Up North, Joanna Richards spoke with local Pulaski resident and 30-year-fisherman Jose Fernandez along a small stream, where he was stalking salmon and escaping the crowd.  Go to full article
DEC fisheries technician David Gordon unsnarls fish from gill nets designed to catch a representative cross-section of the river's fishery. Photo: David Sommerstein.
DEC fisheries technician David Gordon unsnarls fish from gill nets designed to catch a representative cross-section of the river's fishery. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Netting a snapshot of the St. Lawrence River fishery

Every year since 1976, state environmental technicians have set nets across the St. Lawrence River to see what fish they catch. The result is a sort of snapshot of the river's fishery.

David Sommerstein bumped into the Department of Environmental Conservation crew last month at Coles Creek marina. They were prying big and little fish from nets and tossing them into buckets for testing. Roger Klint is an aquatic biologist with the Department of Environmental Conservation and leads the DEC's annual index of fish populations in the St. Lawrence River.  Go to full article
Pumpkinseed (top) vs. Bluegill. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mocobio/5097439352/">Dept. of Environmental Protection MoCo, MD</a>
Pumpkinseed (top) vs. Bluegill. Photo: Dept. of Environmental Protection MoCo, MD

Natural Selections: Sunfish

A common sight is fresh water shallows, sunfish provide an excellent opportunity to observe fish behavior. Dr. Curt Stager talks with Martha Foley about the two main varieties, the pumpkinseed and the bluegill. It may be hard to tell one from another, unless of course, you're a sunfish.  Go to full article
Red blond male guppy. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/statico/">Ian Langworth</a>, cc <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Red blond male guppy. Photo: Ian Langworth, cc some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Guppies, Bright and Drab

If male guppies use bright colors to attract mates, why are there still lots of drab guppies? Bright colors may attract the attention of more than just potential mates. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss the upside and downside of male flash.  Go to full article
State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens, right, and DEC Fisheries Biologist Bill Schoch at  Johns Brook in Keene Valley Thursday. (Photo: Adirondack Daily Enterprise)
State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens, right, and DEC Fisheries Biologist Bill Schoch at Johns Brook in Keene Valley Thursday. (Photo: Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Much left to do on Irene stream restoration

River and stream rehabilitation is under way in communities hit hard by Tropical Storm Irene last year. But officials say a lot of work still remains to be done to put things right.

Lawmakers, local politicians and state officials joined state Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens in Keene Valley last week to inspect stream restoration work on Johns Brook.

Local works crews did emergency repairs immediately following Irene, but environmental specialists said additional work was needed to restore fish and wildlife habitats and protect against future flooding. Chris Morris went along for the inspection.  Go to full article

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