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News stories tagged with "fisheries"

Sea lamprey larvae that washed up on shore. The longer they are, the older they are. Inset: mouth of adult lamprey, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo: Sarah Harris
Sea lamprey larvae that washed up on shore. The longer they are, the older they are. Inset: mouth of adult lamprey, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo: Sarah Harris

Combating sea lamprey on Lake Champlain

If you're fishing for salmon or lake trout in Lake Champlain, you might end up with a fish you didn't bargain for. Sea lamprey are parasitic fish that look like eels. They latch on to larger fish and slowly drain out their body fluids.

Lamprey can decimate entire fish populations, so every four years the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with help from the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and New York's DEC, treats Lake Champlain tributaries with pesticides to control lamprey populations. This year's first treatment took place last week in the Saranac River delta in Plattsburgh.  Go to full article
Champlain Canal, First Lock. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ifl/">Peretz Partensky</a> cc <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Champlain Canal, First Lock. Photo: Peretz Partensky cc some rights reserved

Vermont Senator pressures NYS to close Champlain Canal

New York State is under increasing pressure to close the Champlain Canal to keep a new invasive species out of Lake Champlain. Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy yesterday blasted New York for "ignoring" the threat of the spiny water flea. The water flea was discovered earlier this month in the Feeder Canal near Glens Falls, and the Champlain Canal, both operated by New York.

The Champlain Canal is 60 miles long. It was built at the same time the Erie Canal was constructed to connect the Hudson River to Lake Champlain. It stretches through Rensselaer, Saratoga and Washington counties, from Waterford past Ft. Edward to Whitehall.

Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann has covered both Lake Champlain and invasive species and joined Martha Foley for an update this morning.  Go to full article

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