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News stories tagged with "fishing"

Fishing line threatens eagles

Just after the release of an encouraging report on the health of New York's bald eagle population, biologists and researchers are cautioning anglers on the use of monofilament fishing line. As Jonathan Brown reports, the used line - thrown on the shore by bait-and-lure casters - is a threat to eagles and other wildlife.  Go to full article

New fish virus discovered

New York State is warning anglers that a new strain of fish virus is spreading quickly across the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes. Jonathan Brown reports.  Go to full article

Invasives destroying Great Lakes food chain

Although zebra mussels have been affecting the ecology of the Great Lakes since they were first found in 1988, researchers are continuously surprised at how much damage they've caused. Now, biologists are wondering if zebra mussels and the more recently arrived quagga mussels are to blame for a collapse of the fishery in one of North America's largest lakes. The Environment Report's Lester Graham reports the researchers are also wondering if this collapse is a preview of what will happen to all of the Great Lakes.  Go to full article
The American eel
The American eel

Eel release "grand experiment"

Biologists in Canada are taking extreme measures to prevent the disappearance of a mysterious and fascinating fish. For the first time ever, they've stocked the St. Lawrence River with 144,000 American eels. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Trout variations, pt. 2

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager continue a discussion about trout biology and habitat in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Trout variations

Native brook trout developed in genetically isolated communities, producing variations from one watershed to the next. Through human interventions such as stocking programs and lakeside and streamside development, those distinct communities have been lost in many areas. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss some restoration efforts.  Go to full article

DEC, anglers meet on cormorants

Cormorants are a native fish-eating bird. Almost killed off by pesticides earlier in the century, cormorants are back, and sport fisherman say they're eating up their business. But research hasn't yet shown enough to act. Yesterday the Department of Environmental Conservation and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources held an information session in Ogdensburg. Gregory Warner reports.  Go to full article

Virus Killing More Fish in Lake Ontario?

Thousands more dead fish are washing up on the shore of eastern Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River. Biologists and local businesses are concerned because many different species are being killed. As David Sommerstein reports, a new virus may be causing the die-off.  Go to full article

Virus Threatens River Muskies

Biologists are concerned a new fish virus may become an ongoing threat in the St. Lawrence River. DEC officials have confirmed Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia, or VHS, killed hundreds of round gobies, an invasive species, last month near Cape Vincent. The virus also killed 18 muskies, a prized native fish in the St. Lawrence. The DEC says it hasn't affected river trout or salmon populations so far. David Sommerstein spoke with John Farrell. Farrell directs SUNY ESF's Thousand Islands Biological Station near Clayton. He says the virus is common in Europe and Japan, and in saltwater in the Pacific Northwest. It first showed up in the Great Lakes watershed last year, in the Bay of Quinte in Lake Ontario.  Go to full article

Heard up North: Bait, Ammo, and Parakeets

Kim Crowner manages TNT Tackle, a bait and ammo shop in Edwards. She told Gregory Warner that her two parakeets play an important role in the shopping experience...  Go to full article

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