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News stories tagged with "fishing"

Natural Selections: Trout variations, pt. 2

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager continue a discussion about trout biology and habitat in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Trout variations

Native brook trout developed in genetically isolated communities, producing variations from one watershed to the next. Through human interventions such as stocking programs and lakeside and streamside development, those distinct communities have been lost in many areas. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss some restoration efforts.  Go to full article

DEC, anglers meet on cormorants

Cormorants are a native fish-eating bird. Almost killed off by pesticides earlier in the century, cormorants are back, and sport fisherman say they're eating up their business. But research hasn't yet shown enough to act. Yesterday the Department of Environmental Conservation and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources held an information session in Ogdensburg. Gregory Warner reports.  Go to full article

Virus Killing More Fish in Lake Ontario?

Thousands more dead fish are washing up on the shore of eastern Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River. Biologists and local businesses are concerned because many different species are being killed. As David Sommerstein reports, a new virus may be causing the die-off.  Go to full article

Virus Threatens River Muskies

Biologists are concerned a new fish virus may become an ongoing threat in the St. Lawrence River. DEC officials have confirmed Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia, or VHS, killed hundreds of round gobies, an invasive species, last month near Cape Vincent. The virus also killed 18 muskies, a prized native fish in the St. Lawrence. The DEC says it hasn't affected river trout or salmon populations so far. David Sommerstein spoke with John Farrell. Farrell directs SUNY ESF's Thousand Islands Biological Station near Clayton. He says the virus is common in Europe and Japan, and in saltwater in the Pacific Northwest. It first showed up in the Great Lakes watershed last year, in the Bay of Quinte in Lake Ontario.  Go to full article

Heard up North: Bait, Ammo, and Parakeets

Kim Crowner manages TNT Tackle, a bait and ammo shop in Edwards. She told Gregory Warner that her two parakeets play an important role in the shopping experience...  Go to full article

Natural Selections: West Coast Salmon

Dr. Curt Stager talks with Martha Foley about the latest research into salmon populations on the west coast. Through studies of sediment, historical fluctuations in the population can be tracked.  Go to full article

Heard up North: Ice Fishing on Black Pond

Creepers, Crappies, and the Jig and Spoon...host Gregory Warner gets an ice fishing vocabulary lesson from Rick Conger, at Edwardsville Grocery next to Black Pond.  Go to full article

Ten Threats to the Great Lakes: The Earliest Invader

This week we begin an extensive series on ten threats to the Great Lakes, with a look at some of the earliest invasive species. There are more than 160 non-native species in the Great Lakes basin. If they do environmental or economic harm, they're called invasive species. There are estimates that invasive species cost the region billions of dollars a year. David Sommerstein tells us how some of the region's earliest invaders got into the lakes.  Go to full article

Black River Cleanup Continues

A massive spill of liquid manure in the Black River flowed slower than expected this weekend. Three million gallons of cow waste entered the river last week when a wall in a holding lagoon burst on Marks dairy farms south of Lowville. Hundreds of thousands of fish were killed. The Hudson River/Black River Regulating District released extra water from Stillwater Reservoir on Friday to help move the manure into Lake Ontario. According to News 10 Now, kayaking, rafting, and fishing outfitters along the river had to cancel hundreds of reservations. Steve Litwiler is a spokesperson for the Department of Environmental Conservation, which is handling the spill. He spoke with Todd Moe.  Go to full article

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