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News stories tagged with "flood"

The Black River in full spate, almost four feet above flood stage, noon Thursday April 17.  Photo: Brian Caird
The Black River in full spate, almost four feet above flood stage, noon Thursday April 17. Photo: Brian Caird

Updated: Black River receding, but officials urge caution

UPDATE - 2 P.M. High water in the Black River continues to fall. According to the the National Weather service, the water level at Watertown reads 11.5 feet at this hour. The Schroon River also continues to fall, but remains in the moderate to major flood zone, at just over 9 feet at Rivebank.

UPDATE - 8 A.M. The Black River is falling this morning. According to the National Weather Service, it's now just over 12 feet at Watertown, still two feet above flood stage, but down a foot and a half since it crested early yesterday morning.

It had been expected to crest at 14.2 feet, but after reaching 13.8 feet the river fell through the day. Those levels are still the second highest the Black River has been in recorded history. Flood warnings remain in effect for Jefferson and Lewis counties, and counties along Lake Champlain.


APR 18, 2104 - People along the Black River in the Watertown area were watching the river closely today, after forecasters predicted the Black would come close to setting a new record for high water as it crested. But as of this afternoon, the water levels are going down, according to the National Weather Service and emergency crews on the ground.  Go to full article
Photo: Martha Foley
Photo: Martha Foley

Flood warnings remain as most rivers begin to fall

After several days of high flood waters across the region, most rivers appear to be cresting or beginning to recede, thanks to dry weather and unseasonably cold weather that slowed the spring snow melt.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency yesterday for much of the North Country due to flooding concerns. The declaration affects Essex, Franklin, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties. He said state officials are also keeping a close eye on flooding along the upper Hudson and along the Mohawk River.

Cuomo acknowledged that floodwaters are receding already in most areas, but said that emergency declaration would free up state officials to aid local response efforts.
Flood warnings remain in effect for much of our listening area, including the Black River valley around Watertown. It's expected to crest later today there at more than four feet above flood stage.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mek22/413951082/">Matt Kemberling</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Matt Kemberling, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Xmas eve flood at Hotel Saranac

The Adirondack Daily Enterprise is reporting that a serious flood struck last night in the basement of the historic Hotel Saranac in Saranac Lake.

According to the newspaper, firefighters and village workers spent part of Christmas eve pumping between six and ten feet of water out of the buiding's basement.  Go to full article
Flooding has left this house on Lower Park St. in Malone uninhabitable.  Photo: Julie Grant
Flooding has left this house on Lower Park St. in Malone uninhabitable. Photo: Julie Grant

Malone looks to buy out damaged homes

Lower Park Street in Malone has been reopened to traffic again. It's been closed numerous times this winter, because flooding has left the road impassable. It's also destroyed a handful of houses. Town leaders have been looking at getting the river dredged, to prevent future floods. But federal officials say it might make sense just to buy out the homeowners.  Go to full article
Congklingville Dam on Great Sacandaga Lake. Photo via <a href="http://www.hrbrrd.com/"> Hudson River-Black River Regulating District</a>
Congklingville Dam on Great Sacandaga Lake. Photo via Hudson River-Black River Regulating District

North Country counties settle flood control fight

A multimillion dollar legal battle that simmered for half a decade in the North Country is finally winding to a close.

Four counties - including Albany, Rensselaer, Warren, and Washington - have agreed to settle a dispute with the Hudson River Black River Regulating district over who should pay for flood control efforts.  Go to full article
Battling the rising water of Lake Champlain in Plattsburgh. Photos:  Brian Mann
Battling the rising water of Lake Champlain in Plattsburgh. Photos: Brian Mann

U.S.-Canada studying 2011 flood of Lake Champlain basin

About 70 people gathered at two public meetings last week to talk about the flooding in Lake Champlain and the Richelieu River in spring 2011. The meetings where held by a work-group of the International Joint Commission, which oversees water-related issues between the U.S. and Canada. During the 2011 spring floods, Lake Champlain water levels topped a record high 103 feet.

Jenifer Thalhauser is a New York representative on the work group, and project manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. She says the work group is studying why the region flooded. Thalhauser tells Julie Grant that floods are caused by more than just heavy rain.  Go to full article
Irene brought sudden, awesome devastation to Keene, NY (Photo: Kathy Regan)
Irene brought sudden, awesome devastation to Keene, NY (Photo: Kathy Regan)

Year of the Floods, Part Three: Irene Comes Calling

During this pledge drive week, we're looking back at the North Country's Year of the Floods. We began with the spring rains and snow melt that sent rivers surging and drove Lake Champlain to historic flood levels.

That disaster unfolded slowly, beginning in April and lingering into early July. On August 29th, a very different kind of flood struck the region.

Tropical storm Irene landed like a hammer blow, triggering flash floods and devastating surges of debris. In this next chapter of our series, Brian Mann looks at those first hours of Irene, when wind and water brought chaos to whole towns.  Go to full article
Flood waters hit Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bission, Piercefield
Flood waters hit Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bission, Piercefield

Year of the Floods Part One: The Rivers Rise

During this membership drive week, we'll be looking back at the one big story that shaped much of our news coverage over the last twelve months, a series we're calling The Year of the Floods.

It's a story with two major chapters. Communities are still picking up the pieces from horrific flash floods in late August. But all that came AFTER what was the first record-setting flooding of 2011.

Beginning in April, torrential rains combined with heavy snowmelt, sparking weeks of flooding that caused tens of millions of dollars worth of damages. In part one of our series, Brian Mann looks at the historic rise of rivers last spring that triggered emergencies from Potsdam to Port Henry.  Go to full article
Bill Ferebee examines flood damage in May 2011. File photo: Brian Mann
Bill Ferebee examines flood damage in May 2011. File photo: Brian Mann

In New Year, Ausable Valley towns wrestle with aftermath of Irene

2012 is officially underway, but for towns along the Ausable River, there's still a lot of work ahead cleaning up from the floods of 2011. Communities were hit hard by heavy spring rains last year, and then slammed by tropical storm Irene in late summer.

Brian Mann checked in last week with Bill Ferebee, town supervisor in Keene. Ferebee says a lot of progress has been made restoring normalcy in the Ausable Valley. But fears remain that more floods could come next spring.  Go to full article
Photo: New York State DEC
Photo: New York State DEC

Trees for Tributaries aids flood recovery

Close to 100 people braved the rain late last week to plant trees in communities along the AuSable River devastated by Tropical Storm Irene.

The Lake Champlain Basin "Trees for Tributaries" program, organized by the state Department of Environmental Conservation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, aims to restore and protect stream corridors connected to Lake Champlain following historic flooding Aug. 28. Chris Morris reports.  Go to full article

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