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News stories tagged with "flooding"

This home's foundation has been wrecked by shifting earth
This home's foundation has been wrecked by shifting earth

Rainstorms trigger slide in Keene Valley, threatening homes

Weeks of relentless rain have destabilized a massive section of hillside in the Adrian's Acres neighborhood in Keene Valley, which sits on the slopes of Porter Mountain.

Town and state officials say an area roughly a half-mile wide has begun to shift, slumping downward several inches each day.

One vacation home has already been condemned, and one other house evacuated. At least four more homes are threatened.

Brian Mann was on Porter Mountain yesterday and has our story.  Go to full article

USDA loans can help with post-flood rebuilding

USDA Rural Development is reminding people hit by the recent flooding that low-interest loans and grants available through their 504 program may plug gaps left by homeowners' insurance, and help people make needed post-flood home repairs.  Go to full article
Photo by Mary Jane Watson
Photo by Mary Jane Watson

Returning high waters raise debris, sewage fears

The last couple of days of heavy rain have pushed lake and river levels back up. At Rouses Point, Lake Champlain is expected to continue rising at least through Thursday, approaching three feet above flood stage.

According to the National Weather Service, that means "widespread severe flooding" will continue, affecting shoreline homes and businesses as well as some local highways. Officials are also warning boaters that the floodwaters have pushed a large amount of floating debris into the lake.

As much as four inches of rain have fallen on parts of the region since Saturday. More rain, though not as heavy, is expected over the next two days.

In Colton and Potsdam, the Raquette River has been flooding since the last week of April, and the damage is estimated at over a million dollars so far. As Nora Flaherty reports, continuing rain is cause for worry.  Go to full article

APA process may complicate flood recovery

The National Weather Service says some parts of the North Country will see more than four inches of rain before this latest storm passes. That's pushing Lake Champlain's waters back toward record-high levels. The Ausable and Raquette rivers also surged over the weekend. Most of the region is once again under flood warnings or watches.

For homeowners, businesses and local governments, recovering from the disaster will be tough. For communities inside the Adirondack Park blue line, rebuilding could be complicated by the need for project reviews and permits from the Adirondack Park Agency. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

Bridge on schedule, despite flooding

Recent flooding pushed water levels on Lake Champlain to record heights, causing millions of dollars in damage and forcing people from their homes. It's stalled some parts of the construction of a new bridge across Lake Champlain between Crown Point, NY and Addison, VT. But according to New York officials, the overall timeline hasn't changed. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
An apartment complex in Plattsburgh. Photo: Brian Mann.
An apartment complex in Plattsburgh. Photo: Brian Mann.

Many flooded, but few insured

Now that the flood waters across much of the North Country have receded, the hundreds of property owners whose homes and businesses sustained damage are wondering how they're going to pay for repairs.

Many people impacted by the flooding didn't have flood insurance, which leaves them with few other options unless federal disaster aid becomes available. Chris Knight reports.  Go to full article
Kristen Kimball walks through muddy fields at Essex Farms (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Kristen Kimball walks through muddy fields at Essex Farms (Photos: Brian Mann)

As floods recede, North Country farmers play catch-up

Lake Champlain is still more than two and a half feet above flood stage this morning and communities along the shore are struggling with wind and high water.

But in much of the North Country, historic floods are finally receding. Roads and buildings are being rebuilt. People are cleaning up water-damaged homes.

Among the hardest hit are the region's farmers, who lost weeks of precious time for planting and moving their livestock out to pasture.

Fruit trees typically in bloom are barely showing signs of budding.

"Just the saturated soils and the cool temperatures," said Jay Matteson, Jefferson County's agriculture coordinator.

"Our farms are anxious to get out there, and for the temperatures to come up. Our soil temperatures are down a little bit as well."

Brian Mann visited Essex Farm in the Champlain Valley and has our story.  Go to full article
Saranac Lake Village workers last week, working on closing one of the gates after releasing some water. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Saranac Lake Village workers last week, working on closing one of the gates after releasing some water. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Damages emerge as floodwaters stabilize

The National Weather Service downgraded its flood warning to a "watch" along the Raquette River in St. Lawrence County. But the more severe warning stands in the Champlain Valley. Tupper Lake town and village officials have lifted the state of emergency there. Saranac Lake officials say they can now draw the swollen lakes outflow down about an inch a day.

As the waters recede, communities are getting closer looks at flood damages, with the help of federal emergency management teams.

Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Damage control continues along Vermont Rt. 2 through the Sand Bar State Park area. (Photos: Martha Foley)
Damage control continues along Vermont Rt. 2 through the Sand Bar State Park area. (Photos: Martha Foley)

Damage control, assessment continue along Lake Champlain

Along Lake Champlain, the rain-free few days doesn't mean the flooding, or the emergency, is over. The national weather service says it could be two to three weeks before the lake drops and the flooding recedes. And it's going to be longer than that before counties and communities know how much it's going to cost to fix the damage to roads, bridges and utility systems.

The process of seeking federal aid for the disaster has begun. Congressman Bill Owens was in Plattsburgh yesterday surveying the damage. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Flooded homes last week in Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bisson.
Flooded homes last week in Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bisson.

Lake and rivers recede, but flooding still problem

A mostly rain-free weekend has brought much needed relief to the flood-stricken North Country. But for people whose basements are inundated or whose houses are surrounded by water, the danger isn't over. And the recovery is just beginning.

Lake Champlain has receded slightly to 102.9 feet at Rouses Point. Flood stage is 100 feet. In the town of Champlain, crews were bringing sandbags and supplies over the weekend to families isolated by flooding. Highway superintendent Allen Racine told the Plattsburgh Press-Republican "it's like a war zone."

The Raquette River drew down below 10 feet over the weekend. But some homes in Colton, Potsdam, and Norwood are still under water. David Sommerstein spoke with St. Lawrence County Emergency Services director Marty Hassett this morning.  Go to full article

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