Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "flooding"

An apartment complex in Plattsburgh. Photo: Brian Mann.
An apartment complex in Plattsburgh. Photo: Brian Mann.

Many flooded, but few insured

Now that the flood waters across much of the North Country have receded, the hundreds of property owners whose homes and businesses sustained damage are wondering how they're going to pay for repairs.

Many people impacted by the flooding didn't have flood insurance, which leaves them with few other options unless federal disaster aid becomes available. Chris Knight reports.  Go to full article
Kristen Kimball walks through muddy fields at Essex Farms (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Kristen Kimball walks through muddy fields at Essex Farms (Photos: Brian Mann)

As floods recede, North Country farmers play catch-up

Lake Champlain is still more than two and a half feet above flood stage this morning and communities along the shore are struggling with wind and high water.

But in much of the North Country, historic floods are finally receding. Roads and buildings are being rebuilt. People are cleaning up water-damaged homes.

Among the hardest hit are the region's farmers, who lost weeks of precious time for planting and moving their livestock out to pasture.

Fruit trees typically in bloom are barely showing signs of budding.

"Just the saturated soils and the cool temperatures," said Jay Matteson, Jefferson County's agriculture coordinator.

"Our farms are anxious to get out there, and for the temperatures to come up. Our soil temperatures are down a little bit as well."

Brian Mann visited Essex Farm in the Champlain Valley and has our story.  Go to full article
Saranac Lake Village workers last week, working on closing one of the gates after releasing some water. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Saranac Lake Village workers last week, working on closing one of the gates after releasing some water. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Damages emerge as floodwaters stabilize

The National Weather Service downgraded its flood warning to a "watch" along the Raquette River in St. Lawrence County. But the more severe warning stands in the Champlain Valley. Tupper Lake town and village officials have lifted the state of emergency there. Saranac Lake officials say they can now draw the swollen lakes outflow down about an inch a day.

As the waters recede, communities are getting closer looks at flood damages, with the help of federal emergency management teams.

Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Damage control continues along Vermont Rt. 2 through the Sand Bar State Park area. (Photos: Martha Foley)
Damage control continues along Vermont Rt. 2 through the Sand Bar State Park area. (Photos: Martha Foley)

Damage control, assessment continue along Lake Champlain

Along Lake Champlain, the rain-free few days doesn't mean the flooding, or the emergency, is over. The national weather service says it could be two to three weeks before the lake drops and the flooding recedes. And it's going to be longer than that before counties and communities know how much it's going to cost to fix the damage to roads, bridges and utility systems.

The process of seeking federal aid for the disaster has begun. Congressman Bill Owens was in Plattsburgh yesterday surveying the damage. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Flooded homes last week in Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bisson.
Flooded homes last week in Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bisson.

Lake and rivers recede, but flooding still problem

A mostly rain-free weekend has brought much needed relief to the flood-stricken North Country. But for people whose basements are inundated or whose houses are surrounded by water, the danger isn't over. And the recovery is just beginning.

Lake Champlain has receded slightly to 102.9 feet at Rouses Point. Flood stage is 100 feet. In the town of Champlain, crews were bringing sandbags and supplies over the weekend to families isolated by flooding. Highway superintendent Allen Racine told the Plattsburgh Press-Republican "it's like a war zone."

The Raquette River drew down below 10 feet over the weekend. But some homes in Colton, Potsdam, and Norwood are still under water. David Sommerstein spoke with St. Lawrence County Emergency Services director Marty Hassett this morning.  Go to full article

In the garden: saturated soil, and tips for weed-free asparagus

Flooding over the last two weeks has drenched yards and gardens. Soils are saturated, and that's not good, as Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley. They also have some tips on keeping weeds out of the asparagus patch.  Go to full article
A homeowner scrambles to hold back the water in Plattsburg
A homeowner scrambles to hold back the water in Plattsburg

Lake Champlain surges higher, hitting homes, businesses, vital highways

Over the last week, some parts of the region have seen flash floods and the sudden collapse of bridges and roadways.

But along the 600-mile shoreline of Lake Champlain, the water's rise has been a kind of slow and unstoppable force.

The lake reached another record level yesterday, more than three feet above flood stage.

That has triggered what the National Weather Service described as "widespread heavy flooding."

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin declared a state of emergency yesterday after flying over the lake in a helicopter.

Brian Mann traveled the shoreline in New York and Vermont yesterday and has our story.  Go to full article
Franklin County emergency services coordinator Rick Provost in Tupper Lake with DEC Commissioner Joe Martens), state environmental facilities head Matt Driscoll, Assemblywoman Janet Duprey, and  Tupper Lake Supervisor Roger Amell.
Franklin County emergency services coordinator Rick Provost in Tupper Lake with DEC Commissioner Joe Martens), state environmental facilities head Matt Driscoll, Assemblywoman Janet Duprey, and Tupper Lake Supervisor Roger Amell.

Officials scramble to assess flood damage

Flooding in parts of the North Country is expected to get worse before it gets better.

And even though water levels continue to fluctuate, state and local officials are trying to get a handle on how much damage has occurred so far.

In Saranac Lake two bridges that have been closed for more than a week were reopened early this morning. Village Manager John Sweeney says water levels dropped by about three inches overnight. Sweeney says county inspectors found no problems with any of the bridges in the village yesterday.

Officials from the Federal Emergency Management Administration - or FEMA - were in Saranac Lake Thursday as well. Sweeney says they were focused on evaluating the state of public infrastructure, and may begin looking at some private properties today.

Meanwhile, state Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens toured flood ravaged neighborhoods in Tupper Lake.

Chris Morris was there and has this report...  Go to full article
Firefighters pump out businesses on Market St. in Potsdam
Firefighters pump out businesses on Market St. in Potsdam

Flooding worsens in Potsdam

The most recent rainfall is worsening the flooding situation in many North Country communities. The latest community to declare a state of emergency is the village of Potsdam, after the Raquette River poured over a major retaining wall in the Evans & White parking lot early Wednesday morning. Officials say that's the first time that's happened since 1971.
David Sommerstein visited Potsdam yesterday evening and has this report.  Go to full article
Waves three feet high could hit the flooded Champlain coast this afternoon

Lake Champlain hits record flood stage again, briefly halting Amtrak

Many parts of the North Country were hit by more than two inches of rain yesterday. Onchiota in the Saranac River valley received the biggest dump -- with just over 2.5 inches.

For the first time ever, rain-swollen rivers pushed Lake Champlain to 103.1 feet, the highest level ever recorded, and the water is still rising.

Flooding in Lake Champlain's South Bay near Whitehall forced Amtrak to suspend train service between Albany and Montreal yesterday.

Amtrak spokesman Cliff Cole said train passengers were being taken by bus from Albany to Montreal.

Regular train service is expected to resume later today.

The National Weather Service is predicting stiff west winds this afternoon that could push 3-foot high waves against the shoreline.

Roads and homes along the coast of Lake Champlain have already seen millions of dollars in damage over the last week.

On Thursday, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin told the Burlington Free Press that he expected "more bad news to come" for communities along the Lake Champlain shoreline.

Vermont transportation workers were working yesterday to shore up US Highway 2, which leads to the Champlain Islands and to the ferry crossing to New York.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  48-104 of 80  next -24 »  last »