Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "floods"

The fire hall in Ausable Forks was seriously damaged during tropical storm Irene two years ago. Photo: Brian Mann
The fire hall in Ausable Forks was seriously damaged during tropical storm Irene two years ago. Photo: Brian Mann

Cuomo talks storm readiness, avoids climate talk

Governor Andrew Cuomo was in the Adirondacks again yesterday. He visited Ausable Forks to talk about how New York communities can harden themselves to prepare for future storms and flooding.

Cuomo also offered funding to help communities develop their infrastructure, and he delivered $1.5 million in aid to help rebuild the Upper Jay fire hall, which was damaged during tropical storm Irene.

While Cuomo continues to talk about storm readiness, he also continues to raise questions about climate change - which many scientists believe is causing more extreme weather events.  Go to full article
Debris from the Land of Make Believe is included in the"Raging Rivers" exhibit in Elizabethtown. Photo: Todd Moe
Debris from the Land of Make Believe is included in the"Raging Rivers" exhibit in Elizabethtown. Photo: Todd Moe

"Raging Rivers" exhibit captures devastation, community

An exhibit in Elizabethtown uses debris, photos and video to tell the story of the destruction and devastation that was experienced in the region as a result of last year's Tropical Storm Irene and the Lake Champlain floods.

More than 40 of the best photos from local photographers from last spring and summer were chosen for use in the exhibit, which closes on Columbus Day. Todd Moe talks with director Margaret Gibbs about the Raging Rivers exhibit at the Adirondack History Center Museum.  Go to full article
Who should pay to operate Great Sacandage Reservoir and its massive dam? Photo: HRBRRD
Who should pay to operate Great Sacandage Reservoir and its massive dam? Photo: HRBRRD

North Country dam authority wins round in court

A new ruling by a state Supreme Court could force five counties in the North Country and the Hudson Valley to pay millions of dollars a year to help fund dam operations in the southern Adirondacks. The decision found that it is reasonable for counties to be charged for the benefits they receive in the form of flood protection from dams located on Great Sacandaga and Indian Lake.

As Brian Mann reports, county leaders in the North Country say footing the bill for dam operations would add new pressure on taxpayers at a time when budgets are already tight.  Go to full article
Cattails proliferate in the St. Lawrence River wetland.  Photo: Jenni Werndorf
Cattails proliferate in the St. Lawrence River wetland. Photo: Jenni Werndorf

St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario communities at odds over water levels

Water levels in the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario have been regulated since the 1950s. Levels have been controlled, so they can't rise too high, or drop too low. But the International Joint Commission wants to change that, because the IJC says it's been bad for the environment.

Many scientists and environmental groups support the IJC's plan to allow the water to flow more naturally. But some lake-shore property owners fear that the high water will wash their homes away. Julie Grant reports. Carlet Cleare of WXXI in Rochester assisted in the production of this story.  Go to full article
Battling the rising water of Lake Champlain in Plattsburgh (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Battling the rising water of Lake Champlain in Plattsburgh (Photos: Brian Mann)

Year of the Floods Part Two: The Fury of Lake Champlain

Yesterday we kicked off our pledge drive week with a look back at the North Country's Year of the Floods. Brian Mann reported on historic spring rains and snow melt that sent rivers across the North Country surging beyond their banks, ripping through mountain towns.

Much of that water flowed into Lake Champlain, triggering a secondary flood in communities in New York, Vermont and Quebec that lasted for weeks. This morning, we look back at how dozens of shore towns weathered the long crisis.  Go to full article
These communities that may want to participate in the comment period are preoccupied [with the floods].

Fracking floods!

The news has been dominated this week by more flooding from the remnants of hurricane Lee, and the release from the state's environmental agency of a draft final report on hydrofracking. As Karen DeWitt reports, a key state lawmaker says there are several areas in which these two issues converge.  Go to full article

Adirondack Firefighters Help Flood Victims

More than two dozen firefighters from 10 different Franklin County fire departments returned home earlier this week after spending several days in Delaware County helping the victims of last week's devastating floods. They were mobilized late last week after a request for assistance from the State Office of Fire Prevention and Control. Chris Knight has more.  Go to full article

Three Deaths, Roads Washed Out Amid Heavy Rains

Governor Pataki declared a state of emergency yesterday in 14 upstate counties. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

Eyewitness: Trapped by the Floods

Governor Pataki says property damage from this week's deadly flooding is likely to total about 100 million dollars. Forecasters say more flooding could be coming tomorrow. They say runoff from today's torrential rain could drive water levels across the state even higher. Today's flooding killed at least three people in upstate New York, closed a 50-mile stretch of the Thruway and caused mass evacuations. Gregory Warner spoke with two Mohawk Valley residents - Sarah Ackroyd of Fort Plain and Jim Garrison of Nelliston.  Go to full article

Ice Jams Flood Clinton County Village

Ice jams on the Great Chazy river in Clinton County triggered flooding over the weekend that forced some residents to evacuate. A state of emergency was declared Sunday in the village of Champlain. Flooding was also reported on the Chateaugay River in Quebec. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

1-10 of 11  next 1 »  last »