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News stories tagged with "food-stamps"

Catherine Matthews, director of the Canton food pantry. Photo: Canton Church and Community Program
Catherine Matthews, director of the Canton food pantry. Photo: Canton Church and Community Program

New program will help St. Lawrence County food banks keep shelves fuller

A new delivery method will help St. Lawrence County food banks keep their shelves full. The Food Bank of Central New York's new retail partnership program in St. Lawrence County will expedite donations from Walmart.

The idea is simple: to get food to the people who need it faster, in a year when the brutally cold weather has made it harder for people already struggling to make ends meet.  Go to full article
Photo: USDA, Some rights reserved.
Photo: USDA, Some rights reserved.

What's in the Farm Bill for the North Country?

A revamped Farm Bill could reach the House floor for a vote as early as today. The massive legislation which sets agricultural and nutrition policy for the country has already been scuttled two years in a row. But bipartisan negotiators say they have a $500 billion five-year package that will pass.

David Sommerstein joins Martha Foley to talk about what the Farm Bill would mean for the North Country.  Go to full article
Sarah Moore, right, stands with her boss, Catherine Matthews, in the food pantry section of the Church and Community Program in Canton, NY. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Sarah Moore, right, stands with her boss, Catherine Matthews, in the food pantry section of the Church and Community Program in Canton, NY. Photo: Zach Hirsch

SNAP recipients, supporters anxious about 2014

In November, families who rely on food stamps saw their monthly food budget lowered, when a boost to SNAP from the 2009 federal stimulus expired.

It is almost certain there will be even more cutbacks when congress passes a new farm bill next year, although it's not clear how big those will be. Last week, we checked in with some people who worry that 2014 will mean much harder times.  Go to full article
Canton resident Betty Peckham at the Unitarian Universalist Church, where students are cleaning up after the weekly Campus Kitchens dinner. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Canton resident Betty Peckham at the Unitarian Universalist Church, where students are cleaning up after the weekly Campus Kitchens dinner. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Campus Kitchens: free food and companionship in Canton

Campus Kitchens is a nation-wide program, run by college students, that feeds the needy. In Canton, St. Lawrence University students started their own branch a few years ago.

Every Monday, volunteers cook a meal and serve it for free. But people don't just come for the food.  Go to full article
SNAP benefits sign at a farmers market. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/melaniewong/4712301777/">mswine</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
SNAP benefits sign at a farmers market. Photo: mswine, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Hunger groups ask Schumer to block food stamp cuts

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) Anti-hunger groups are calling on New York Sen. Charles Schumer to block cuts to food stamps.

Anti-hunger activists have launched a statewide campaign urging Schumer to vote against any farm bill that includes cuts in food stamp funding. They also want Schumer to push to restore recent cuts.  Go to full article
The Food Bank of Central New York will receive $380,000 of the governor's grant. Photo: Zach Hirsch
The Food Bank of Central New York will receive $380,000 of the governor's grant. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Food banks get pre-holiday boost

On November 1st, a boost to food stamps from the 2009 federal stimulus expired. For the millions of Americans who rely on food stamps, that meant a hole in their monthly food budget.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has been urging New Yorkers to give to local food pantries, and as Zach Hirsch reports, his own office is leading by example.  Go to full article
Congressman Bill Owens and Richard Eakins talk about corn storage. Photo: Sarah Harris.
Congressman Bill Owens and Richard Eakins talk about corn storage. Photo: Sarah Harris.

Owens: farm bill may happen in 2013

There's still no Farm Bill this year.

The Farm Bill sets policy for agriculture nationwide. But most of the bill--money-wise--goes to food stamps. And disagreement over cuts to food stamps has held the overall bill up for over a year.

This week, members of the House and Senate will start hashing out a new compromise version of the bill. At a visit to a North Country soybean farm, Congressman Bill Owens said that may mean progress.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/59392555@N00/6863773432/">Selbe B</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Selbe B, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

As Nov. 1 approaches, social service providers brace for impact

At the end of the month, families who depend on food stamps will start getting less money for their groceries. On November 1st, a boost to food stamps from the federal stimulus from 2009 will expire.

Social service providers are bracing for a spike in demand for emergency food services. Zach Hirsch reports.  Go to full article
U.S. Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh)
U.S. Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh)

Owens: rural America losing clout in farm policy

Lawmakers and agricultural leaders are searching for a way forward after the Farm Bill went down in flames in the House last week.

Many Republicans bristled at the nearly $100 billion a year price tag. About 80 percent of that is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP -- better known as Food Stamps. Some Democrats voted no to protest of cuts to that program. In the end, the farm bill went down by a significant margin, even though GOP House Speaker John Boehner voted for it.

It's unclear if the House will take up the Senate's version - which passed earlier this month - or seek to extend the 2008 farm bill for another year.  Go to full article

Plenty at stake in farm bill standoff

UPDATE: Thursday afternoon, the Wall Street Journal reports House Speaker John Boehner has officially confirmed that the farm bill won't be taken up until after the November elections.

North Country farmers are anxiously watching the status of the new farm bill in the House of Representatives. The current farm bill expires on September 30. The Senate passed a new five-year, $497 billion farm bill over the summer. But House leadership has yet to let its version come to the floor for a vote. "Tea Party" Republicans want to see much deeper cuts in the biggest item in the bill -- the federal food stamp program.

So what if the Farm Bill isn't passed by the end of the month? How would that affect North Country agriculture?  Go to full article

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