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News stories tagged with "forest-products"

An Adirondack clearcut in the 1920s. Clear-cutting remains controversial a century later. Photo: New York State Archives
An Adirondack clearcut in the 1920s. Clear-cutting remains controversial a century later. Photo: New York State Archives

Clearcut logging plan sparks blistering APA debate

A plan by the Adirondack Park Agency to streamline permit applications for large-scale clearcut logging sparked fierce debate yesterday.

Supporters of the plan say it will encourage loggers and landowners to adopt better harvesting practices. At the APA's monthly meeting in Ray Brook, some commissioners spoke passionately in favor of the change.

But others expressed deep skepticism about the plan.  Go to full article
Logging truck in the Adirondacks. Photo: <a href"http://www.flickr.com/photos/ellenm1/">ellenm1</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">some rights reserved</a>
Logging truck in the Adirondacks. Photo: ellenm1, CC some rights reserved

APA delays new clear-cutting rule for Adk loggers

State officials are delaying consideration of a new plan that would ease clear-cutting rules for loggers working in the Adirondack Park.

The measure was expected to be taken up at the Adirondack Park Agency meeting next week in Ray Brook.

If approved, it will allow some timber operators to clear-cut stands of trees larger than 25 acres without a full review by the Adirondack Park Agency.  Go to full article
Forest lands harvested for more than a century will soon be "forever wild."  Photo: Brian Mann
Forest lands harvested for more than a century will soon be "forever wild." Photo: Brian Mann

Do big Adirondack conservation deals hurt loggers?

Governor Andrew Cuomo says the big Finch conservation deal in the Adirondacks will open new lands to snowmobilers, hikers, hunters, and anglers. State officials and green groups say that could mean a major boost for the North Country's tourism industry.

But critics say the $50 million deal will hurt the timber industry, making it harder for struggling loggers and mill operators. Some industry leaders say they worry about the loss of productive timberlands that have been harvested for more than a century.  Go to full article
Chris Rdzanek, manager of museum facilities at The Wild Center, shows off the new boiler (PHOTO:  Brian Mann)
Chris Rdzanek, manager of museum facilities at The Wild Center, shows off the new boiler (PHOTO: Brian Mann)

As outdoor wood boilers draw fire, a new generation of wood heat comes on line

While the debate rages over pollution of outdoor wood boilers, a new generation of wood heat systems is already being rolled out.

Scientists and manufacturers say so-called "wood gasification" boilers burn much more efficiently with far less smoke and ash. A new, state-of-the-art boiler is now on-line at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake, burning wood pellets produced in Massena.

As Brian Mann reports, the manufacturer hopes to sell similar systems to businesses and government offices across the North Country.  Go to full article
DEC Commissioner Peter Grannis has worked closely with Nature Conservancy leaders
DEC Commissioner Peter Grannis has worked closely with Nature Conservancy leaders

DEC, Nature Conservancy partnership on land deals reshapes Adirondacks

This morning we begin a three-part series looking at the major land acquisitions that are reshaping the Adirondack Park. Hundreds of thousands of acres have changed hands in the Adirondacks, bought from private owners by New York State. This week we'll look at how those sometimes controversial deals are made, and who makes them.
Attorney General Andrew Cuomo and state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli announced earlier this month that they will investigate the 2008 purchase of 20,000 acres in Clinton County, and tomorrow we'll look at that current controversy.

Today, we start with the big picture.
Many of these big land deals have resulted from a close partnership between the state Department of Environmental Conservation and one environmental group: the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.
Supporters praise the partnership for facilitating protection of prized lakes, mountains and open space. Critics say the relationship is too close and warrants more scrutiny. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Finch Pruyn paper mill to be part of sale (Photo source:  Finch, Pruyn website)
Finch Pruyn paper mill to be part of sale (Photo source: Finch, Pruyn website)

Finch Pruyn sale marks end of era

In a decision that will reshape the Adirondack timber industry, Finch, Pruyn and Company says it hopes to sell its paper mill in Glens Falls and more than a 160,000 acres of forestland in the Adirondack Park. The price wasn't disclosed. The proposed buyer is Connecticut-based Atlas Paper. As Brian Mann reports, the sale of Finch Pruyn and Company brings to an end a 142-year chapter of North Country history.  Go to full article

Company Says Koch Buy-Out Won't Affect Plattsburgh Mill

Koch Industries doesn't plan immediate changes at the Georgia Pacific Mill in Plattsburgh. The private company's buy-out of Georgia Pacific was announced earlier this week. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

IP Land Deal Stuck in Local Feud, Global Restructuring

A historic deal to block development on more than a quarter-million acres of International Paper land in the Adirondacks remains in limbo. The conservation plan endorsed by Governor Pataki is caught up in a feud with local governments. It has also being complicated by IP's plan, announced this week, to sell off millions of acres of timberland worldwide. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Domtar Deal Raises Questions About State Management of Vast Adk Lands

During his state of the state address, Governor Pataki praised a new land deal with Domtar Industries that will preserve more than a hundred thousand acres of timber land in Clinton and Franklin Counties. The 23-million dollar deal follows closely on the heels of other land purchases, involving International Paper and National Lead. Much of the land will be protected by conservation easements. Logging will continue, but sprawl and housing development are banned. Pro-environment groups say easements are an important tool for preserving open space and improving recreation. But as Brian Mann reports, some critics wonder if the state has the resources to manage these complex land deals over the long haul.  Go to full article

Wood Power Electric Generator Planned for Tupper

With oil prices hovering at record levels, more north country families are using wood stoves as a primary heating source. New York state is now exploring the possibility of generating electricity using wood waste from the region's logging industry. On a visit this week to Tupper Lake, Governor Patki unveiled a state plan to build an experimental wood-powered generator in the village. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

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