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News stories tagged with "fort-covington"

The Hogansburg Triangle is in pink on this map.
The Hogansburg Triangle is in pink on this map.

Judge sustains part of Mohawk land claim

Native tribes' claims to ancestral lands in New York haven't fared so well recently. In 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court essentially dismissed the Oneida Nation's land claim, saying too much time had passed since the 18th century treaties the claims are based on. Other courts have followed that ruling with other tribes' land claims.

So this week, when a judge recommended throwing out 85% of the Mohawk land claim in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe focused on the 15% that has a chance to survive. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Andy Schrader stands on his dock on the bank of the Salmon River (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Andy Schrader stands on his dock on the bank of the Salmon River (Photos: Brian Mann)

On the Salmon River, a time of healing or an eco-disaster?

This summer, a private contractor ripped out a century-old dam on the Salmon River in northern Franklin County. State officials said the structure was deteriorating and posed a safety hazard. The town of Fort Covington decided to remove the dam, rather than pay for costly repairs. Green groups say the project will eventually restore crucial fish and bird habitat. But two months after the work was done, a massive plug of silt and sand still clogs the river. As Brian Mann reports, many locals worry that the Salmon River could be permanently damaged.  Go to full article
Fort Covington Dam
Fort Covington Dam

Fort Covington Dam coming down

A hundred-year old dam on the Salmon River in Franklin County is coming down. The Fort Covington dam was last used for hydropower in the 1950s. It's been crumbling ever since. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Elaine Sunde networking with other North Country historians
Elaine Sunde networking with other North Country historians

One family's history leads back to the North Country

There are families in this rugged part of the country who trace their roots back two centuries and more. Others simply passed through, migrating west. The trail still runs both ways. Our Adirondack reporter, Brian Mann, grew up in the Midwest and out on the West Coast. But it turns out his own family's story leads through northern New York and Vermont way back in the early 1800s. The discovery came as part of his mother's research and her journey back into American history. Here's Brian's audio diary.  Go to full article
An increasingly militarized US-Canada border
An increasingly militarized US-Canada border

Emergency vehicles delayed at US-Canada border

For generations, American and Canadian ambulance and fire crews have rushed across the border to each other's aid in times of emergency. But local officials on both sides of the border say new Homeland Security rules are creating dangerous delays, slowing response times and threatening partnerships that formed over a century ago. Federal officials promise improvements, but new passport rules could make the situation even more complicated. Independent producer Jacob Resneck has this special report.  Go to full article
Politicians have spent hundreds of millions of dollars improving border crossings like this one north of Plattsburgh (Source: USGSA)
Politicians have spent hundreds of millions of dollars improving border crossings like this one north of Plattsburgh (Source: USGSA)

Report: US-Canada border "dangerously vulnerable"

Investigators for the Government Accountability Office say they were able to smuggle fake contraband designed to look like a dirty atomic bomb into the United States. The GAO is the investigative arm of Congress. In a report released yesterday, GAO officials say they crossed easily at seven different remote rural sites, including four unidentified spots on the US-Canada border. As Brian Mann reports, there's a growing bipartisan consensus that the Bush Administration's strategy for security on the northern border isn't working.  Go to full article

On the Border with the Minutemen

Civilian border watchers first caused controversy in April observing the Arizona border. Last month The Minutemen Civil Defense Corp expanded their watch to include more of the southern border, and parts of the Canadian border with New York and Vermont.

Critics say members of the minutemen have ties to hate groups. But Republicans in the House have proposed a bill that would set up an official "border corps" for civilian volunteers. Gregory Warner joined a dozen minutemen when they camped out in Fort Covington two weekends ago.  Go to full article

Mohawk Land Claim: State Entices Counties With Cash

The Franklin County legislature yesterday threw its support behind Governor Pataki's settlement to the 23-year old Mohawk land claim. St. Lawrence County is expected to do the same tonight. It's an about face for both counties, who had opposed the deal when it was announced last month. As David Sommerstein reports, the state more than quadrupled its compensation package to local communities.  Go to full article

Locals Speak Out Against Land Claim Deal

The St. Lawrence County legislature is expected to oppose a proposed settlement of the 22-year old Mohawk land claim. Legislators complain they weren't consulted before the deal was made public. At a finance committee meeting last night, lawmakers put off taking formal action against the deal. According to the Watertown Daily Times, the full Board will consider a resolution and a list of concerns about the settlement on Monday.
The agreement between three Mohawk councils and Governor Pataki still must be approved by tribal members by referendum on November 27th. The leaders of towns in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties that would be affected by the settlement are also speaking out. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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