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News stories tagged with "fowler"

Tom Aldous, Bill Siebels and Liston Willard holding Nina.
Tom Aldous, Bill Siebels and Liston Willard holding Nina.

Farms that run on real horse power

It's harvest season, and while most farmers dream of the latest and best farm equipment available, there are some that prefer a slower way of doing things. Even outside the Amish community there are farmers who work their land using old-fashioned techniques and tools. They favor the sounds of huge hooves plodding across the fields. This weekend, draft horses will take center stage at Plow Days at the Siebels Farm in Fowler. Todd Moe stopped by the Liston and Susan Willard farm recently to talk with three farmers who still use real horse power.  Go to full article
Larry Lago (left) and friends burn a wood shed outside Copenhagen.
Larry Lago (left) and friends burn a wood shed outside Copenhagen.

Burn ban has fans and critics

A rural tradition is now a thing of the past, or at least, so says the law. Two weeks ago, New York outlawed burn barrels and many other types of open burning. You can still burn brush and small tree limbs and have small campfires. The question is will people obey the new burn ban? David Sommerstein surveyed some residents and has our story.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews and his corn harvester.
Bob Andrews and his corn harvester.

A Year on the Farm, revisited: the harvest, finally

Two years ago, David Sommerstein spent a year reporting from Bob Andrews' dairy farm in St. Lawrence County. He wanted to learn what farmers did day-to-day, month-to-month. But about this time of the year, he missed the corn harvest. Well, it took awhile, but David made it to this year's harvest, a challenging one at that, for A Year on the Farm, revisited.  Go to full article
Diane Andrews prepares for the afternoon milking in the milk house.
Diane Andrews prepares for the afternoon milking in the milk house.

A Year on the Farm: Going Out Quietly?

As the year comes to an end, so does our series A Year on the Farm. David Sommerstein's been sending regular postcards from Bob Andrews 80-cow dairy near Gouverneur in St. Lawrence County. We've learned about calving and plowing and harvesting, round bales and square bales. But what REALLY makes dairy different from any other kind of farming are the daily milkings. That's where the series started, and that's where it'll end.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews, new grandfather, on his new feeding pad.
Bob Andrews, new grandfather, on his new feeding pad.

A Year on the Farm: life and death (and life)

Farming is, really, the story of the life cycle. Planting and harvesting. Calving and slaughtering. Barns are raised. Some eventually fall back to the earth. David Sommerstein's nearing completion of a year-long cycle on Bob Andrews' farm near Gouverneur. Today, life and death...and life again...on the farm.

BREAKING NEWS: Yesterday at 11:51am, Bob and Diane Andrews' daughter, Jessie, gave birth to Margot Diane Pritting in Syracuse - 7 pounds, 5 ounces. Both mother and child are healthy and happy. Bob and Diane hope to get away to see their first grandchild when they can find someone to milk the cows. A big congrats to the Andrews!  Go to full article
Bob Andrews and his silos, topped off for winter.
Bob Andrews and his silos, topped off for winter.

A Year on the Farm: batten down the hatches

This year, David Sommerstein's been sending monthly audio postcards from Bob Andrews' 80-cow dairy farm near Gouverneur. At this time of year, farmers are in high gear to batten down the hatches for winter. They're stowing away machinery and trying to get that last cutting in from the fields to top off the silo. Here's another edition of A Year on the Farm.  Go to full article
Bob's more than six feet tall, so the corn really is high...
Bob's more than six feet tall, so the corn really is high...

A Year on the Farm: The sound of corn growing

This year, David Sommerstein's spending time each month on one dairy farm to learn more about what farmers do every day. The series is called A Year on the Farm. Our willing farmer is Bob Andrews in the town of Fowler near Gouverneur. Last episode, David learned all about hay. The other big crop for dairy farmers is corn, and it's Bob Andrews' favorite. So today's edition of A Year on the Farm is an ode to corn.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews and his furrowed fields in Fowler.
Bob Andrews and his furrowed fields in Fowler.

A Year on the Farm: Plowing in Between the Rocks

When you drive across the North Country at this time of year, you'll see some farm fields already green with shoots. Others are deep brown and ready for seeding. Some haven't changed since winter. Soils vary according to microregion. Some of the last fields to be tilled are near Gouverneur, where the clay soil is cool and wet. That's where farmer Bob Andrews lives. David Sommerstein hopped on his tractor for this month's edition of A Year on the Farm.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews on his farm.
Bob Andrews on his farm.

A Year on the Farm: It's Management, Dummy

Spend time around a dairy farm, and you'll learn a lot about the farmer who owns it. Some barnyards are muddy and chaotic, others immaculate and organized. Some farmers get obsessed with grazing, or breeding perfect heifers, or using bugs to fight disease on their fields. Some love big tractors, others hate 'em. David Sommerstein's doing a year of stories on everyday dairy farming with Bob Andrews, who farms near Gouverneur. Bob's a manager.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews tends his herd with a smile.
Bob Andrews tends his herd with a smile.

A Year on the Farm: No Calves, No Milk

It's the time of year when calf pens pop up across the North Country landscape. It's easy to forget that making milk is really about making baby cows. They don't call it "animal husbandry" for nothing. David Sommerstein's doing a year of stories on the ins and outs of life on a dairy farm. Today, dry and freshened cows, calving, and the reproductive business of a dairy farm.  Go to full article

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