Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "fracking"

New York's Dept. of Environmental Conservation delayed its environmental review of fracking until the go-ahead is given by the Dept. of Health. Photo: DEC headquarters in Albany, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Kurtman518">Kurtman518</a>, released to the public domain
New York's Dept. of Environmental Conservation delayed its environmental review of fracking until the go-ahead is given by the Dept. of Health. Photo: DEC headquarters in Albany, Kurtman518, released to the public domain

Fracking delay's effect is in the eye of the beholder

Last week, New York State officials announced another delay of their final decision on hydrofracking. The Department of Environmental Conservation will wait for a report on the health protections in its environmental review of fracking. Then the environmental review can be completed.

The time frame could be less than a month or it could be much longer. And both pro- and anti-fracking groups took heart from the delay.  Go to full article
Josh Fox (left) is best known for his Oscar-nominated 2010 anti-fracking documentary, <em>Gasland</em>. Pro-fracking film-maker Phelim McAleer, is the producer of <em>Fracknation</em>. The two met briefly outside a NY Senate hearing. Photos: Karen DeWitt.
Josh Fox (left) is best known for his Oscar-nominated 2010 anti-fracking documentary, Gasland. Pro-fracking film-maker Phelim McAleer, is the producer of Fracknation. The two met briefly outside a NY Senate hearing. Photos: Karen DeWitt.

Fracking filmmakers dispute at the Capitol

Dueling pro- and anti-fracking filmmakers were in Albany for screenings and promotions for their films Monday, as they await a decision by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on whether natural gas extraction by hydrofracking will be permitted in New York.

If the state Department of Environmental Conservation is to allow a rule making process on fracking to conclude by the end of the month, it must first make public its generic environmental impact statement on fracking.

Tensions are high, as both sides wait to find out whether the state will go ahead with fracking. And as the opposing film makers waited in the halls of the Capitol, those tensions erupted.  Go to full article

DEC: no fracking decision until health study is done

The Cuomo Administration says it won't be ruling on whether to allow hydraulic fracturing in New York until an ongoing health review is finished.

The delays have have forced the state's Department of Environmental Conservation to open another public comment period, beginning December 12.  Go to full article
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York: pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York: pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail

DEC: still questions about hydrofracking

New York Department of Environmental Conservation commissioner commented in-depth for the first time about a new health review that has once again delayed a decision on hydraulic fracturing in New York.

Joe Martens says the internal study by the Department of Health is turning up more questions. His comments Friday came as some landowners, and politicians, in the Marcellus Shale region are growing impatient for a final decision on hydrofracking.  Go to full article
Photo: Karen DeWitt
Photo: Karen DeWitt

GOP senate candidate urges action on hydrofracking

Wendy Long, the Republican Senate candidate challenging Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, is urging swift action on hydraulic fracturing in New York state.  Go to full article
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York. Pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York. Pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail

Anti fracking health experts question in-house health study

A group of public health experts are questioning whether New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's health officials can do a credible job reviewing a health study on fracking, saying independent reviewers would be a better choice.

The over 50 doctors, nurses and scientists include Dr. David carpenter, a former Health department official who now heads The Institute for Health and the Environment at SUNY's School of Public Health.  Go to full article
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr

Panel says fracking would help boost upstate

A meeting of upstate Chambers of Commerce has come out strongly in support of hydrofracking in new York.

As the Innovation Trail's Kate O'Connell reports, panelists meeting in Rochester believe the controversial process will eventually be approved and that New York is in a good position to benefit.  Go to full article
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York. Pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York. Pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Image: Innovation Trail

Expenses, health, major concerns in fracking debate

Governor Cuomo's environmental commissioner is rejecting calls by environmentalists for an independent health impact study on hydrofracking. But Environmental Commissioner Joe Martens, says the state's health commissioner has agreed to conduct a review.

"Government is the public's independent reviewer," Martens said in explanation of his decision. "To suggest private interests or academic experts bring more independence to the process than government is exactly wrong."

The statement comes as Governor Cuomo says he's not pushing his environmental agency to make a final decision on fracking any time soon. Martens says any decision on hydrofracking in New York will be delayed until after the health department completes its study. He says if there is a public health concern that cannot be addressed, then fracking won't go forward.

Meanwhile, Environmental groups warn that, based on costs in other states, hydraulic fracturing could be expensive for the state's local governments.  Go to full article
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr

Fracking supporters, foes prepare legal next steps

New York State is poised to issue its plans for hydrofracking. The decision could come any time after Labor Day. But there's no guarantee the controversy will die down, and both opponents and supporters are exploring their legal options.  Go to full article
Protestors in Albany urge Gov. Cuomo to reject hydrofracking development. Photo: Brian Mann
Protestors in Albany urge Gov. Cuomo to reject hydrofracking development. Photo: Brian Mann

Protestors, industry pressure Cuomo on gas fracking

Hundreds of people joined a protest Monday on the bank of the Hudson River in Albany. They're hoping to convince Governor Andrew Cuomo to reject plans for hydraulic fracturing in New York. Companies hope to use the controversial drilling method to extract natural gas from deposits that lie deep underground.

Cuomo is expected to decide any day now whether to give the industry the green light, and activists and lobbyists are scrambling to influence the governor's final plan and to shape how his decision is viewed by the public.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  11-30 of 25  next -5 »  last »