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News stories tagged with "frankenpine"

Two bands, one big CD release party

This weekend, two bands with big followings in the Adirondacks will be releasing new CDs. They have decided to join together to hold one big CD release party in Lake Placid. Joel Hurd tells us more.  Go to full article

New progress on cell phones eases Adirondack tower feud

On Friday, the Adirondack Park Agency gave the green light to a new cell phone tower near Paul Smiths College, north of Saranac Lake. The project comes at a time when towers are being built at a rapid pace across the Adirondacks. As Brian Mann reports, that progress follows years of feuding between state regulators, cell phone companies and environmentalists.  Go to full article

APA approves Tupper Lake power corridor, despite NY Constitution questions

The Adirondack Park Agency voted on Friday to approve construction of a new power line corridor for Tupper Lake that will cross state forest preserve land. Critics on the board say the decision violates the "forever wild" provision of New York's constitution. The APA also voted to allow a new hotel on Racquette Lake. And they voted to allow Verizon to build a new cell phone tower along the Northway that will be camouflaged to look like a pine tree. It was busy week for the agency. Brian Mann discussed development with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
"Frankenpine" (above) and "The Tallest Tree" by Peter Seward
"Frankenpine" (above) and "The Tallest Tree" by Peter Seward

"Stealth Towers" show provokes cell phone discussion

A new exhibition opens tonight in Saranac Lake that looks at the increasingly popular strategy of disguising cell-phone and other communication towers. From fake pine trees to church steeples rigged with antennas, the paintings in "Stealth Towers" show how new technology can alter the look and the meaning of our most traditional symbols. Brian Mann spoke with Lake Placid painter Peter Seward as he was installing the show at Bluseed Studios this week at Bluseed Studios.  Go to full article

"Frankenpine" Tower Suit Thrown Out

A state Supreme Court judge in Saratoga Springs has dismissed an
environmental group's lawsuit over a controversial cell phone tower on Lake George. The so-called "frankenpine" tower will be built to look like a huge pine tree. The Adirondack Council sued to block the plan, arguing that it would mar a scenic vista. But as Brian Mann reports, the case was dismissed on a technicality.  Go to full article

Fake Pine Tower For Pilot Knob Clears Hurdle, Faces Suit

The Lake George Park Commission says a cell phone tower on Pilot Knob won't harm scenic views. Nextel plans to disguise the tower as a giant fake pine tree and already has approval from the Adirondack Park Agency. But as Brian Mann reports, a pro-environment group now plans to sue to stop the project.  Go to full article
A cell tower in disguise
A cell tower in disguise

Fake Tree Tower will be Built on Lake George

The Adirondack Park Agency is poised to approve a controversial cell phone tower on Pilot Knob above Lake George. The tower--dubbed "frankenpine" by pro-environment groups--will be built to resemble a white pine tree. An APA committee says the tower will be nearly invisible to boaters and residents. The project faced stiff opposition from local residents and government leaders. Some APA staff members also urged the Agency commission to reject the project. But the cell phone company and state Senator Betty Little say the project will improve communication on Lake George. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Nextel has proposed a "tower tree" for Pilot Knob (File photo)
Nextel has proposed a "tower tree" for Pilot Knob (File photo)

APA Senior Staff: No Opinion on Pilot Knob Cell Tower

Senior staff at the Adirondack Park Agency have once again overruled their field staff's recommendation on a controversial project. A report issued Wednesday by the APA offered no opinion on the future of a cell tower proposed for Pilot Knob on Lake George. In May, one of the APA's senior attorneys issued a preliminary report condemning the project. As Brian Mann reports, the change angered pro-environment groups.  Go to full article

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